10-23-12 Board Notes

Updates and old business:

 

-Adrien’s not here (surprise!)

-Homeless Marathon: 

-Went as well as possible on our end. Broadcast did have some difficulties.

-Thanks to all. esp D and A. Jesse says “what?”

-integrate a local Middletown aspect to it (Middletown had a 10 year plan to end homelessness)

-BM was slightly frustrated with the audio that they sent through, DB said it was hard to jump into the middle of the report

-overall was a success aside from the glitches (listener feedback?)

 

-CMJ Report: 

-benefits: made a lot of contacts, contacts with band members 1) Foxygen (one member lives in Woodstock, CT-THEY’RE BLOWIN’ UP! We wanna get ‘em. We also need to get their) 2)The Murals (from Louisville, KY, 3) Sidewalk Dave 4) Mr. Muthafukin eXquire (said he loved playing Wesleyan, wants to come back, “sex rap?”) 5) Terrorbird 6) Lyons Den (Mara went to Wesleyan) 7) Mykki Blanco (J. Kilbourne might be a contact; administration had an issue getting money to him on time)

-concert series?! Issue of it being open to the public (security difference can translate into $; they won’t fund things off campus; Green Street?). Counter to our mission to not have it open to the public (have some open to public and some not). Who’s our target audience?

*What’s the purpose of the concert series? Make sure these concerts are in line with the goals of WESU.

*Lyons Den and Sidewalk Dave open to public and at the chapel

*Mr. Muthafukin eXquire and Foxygen not

-Task force to discuss these issues! Virgil, Jesse, Adam, Mickey, Isabelle?, Me, anyone else on staff (Mary send an email!!!!)

-Tune-In: spam email???? We won a prize? (Virgil doesn’t know how the alphabet works). Avery will call Ben back (she wants that plaque)

 

-Training:

- Seems to be lots of participation. (“Never seen these kind of a numbers” –DB)

-Can we hold training at Beckham’ somewhere this weekend? (Adam will book a room in Beckham)

-Ben proposes we bring back an old prerecorded show requirement for training (could also be considered a service hour or just extra super stars!).  This could generate programming could be useful during breaks.  Concern: too many trainees, not enough studio time. Text document to accompany this so could be easily input into Spinitron. (Adam will email about this and say in person)

-everyone involved at the station submit a bio to have on file?

-come up with a “wish list” of shows we wish we had?

-compile a history of the type of shows we’ve had on WESU? Or just tell trainees to make sure that they are planning a show that hasn’t been done before. Our training has worked well in creating unique shows in the past. Can offer this activity as a service hour opportunity. (David Bauer will craft an email and send it to the board)

-every 5 years DJ retest to be on air

 

-Fall Break: What is policy/expectation  after staff send that email seeking coverage?

-falls back on the program director, what is the protocol (follow-up)?

-needs to be a system in place that works

-say in program application your availability for the breaks?

-have a list of people who will be on campus during breaks

-pre-record your show

-who’s logging spinitron? 

            -CODE O’ CONDUCT! (Avery will talk to Adrien)

 

Events:

-Rec fair:

-How are we doing on street and internet promotions? Unclear. Isabelle will chat with Mickey (version that says “Free Admission”)

-MDs have stuff to donate

-need help with sorting (garbage vs. sellable) (Adam will email!)

-How are we set for volunteers before and during the event? Mickey said it was okay

-Lee is willing to load stuff up Saturday but needs volunteers to help…(Avery will email Lee, cc Adam)

            -Wesleying post/reminder (Saturday afternoon)

 

-Lecture series:

-Doug B ticketing (November 1st)? Free tickets-costs a lot more, adds an additional headache. Could have a section roped off (whatever number we request; we can take reservations-people call in ahead of time)

*Virgil: poster, facebook event (questions on facebook)

*THINK OF QUESTIONS

-Finding an office for him to use and ok to attend drum class?

 

-Studio reservations sign up board: 

-Any Ideas on how to fix this? It’s a board duty now (make sure the date has been changed) 

-Perhaps require that the person signing up for studio space, putting a date beside your sign up, switch color on a weekly basis (Virgil will do this)

-Phone is best.

-Long run perhaps a digital screen controlled by google doc? (We need to figure out what’s most important; a member’s only section on the website)

 

Other stuff

-Audio Archiving system:

-Ben M has order the Static IP address that are necessary, getting the company set up in finance system, will turn over to Dan when we get the server.

 

-WESU Website:

-Need a team to work on updating it: ie: adding pages for music department, training, and events.

-Task force: People who are computer people! (coordinate by email-Avery’s on it!!!!)

 

-Heads up

-Kyle S. of The Hear N Now (Evan Okun) M&PL piece will need to work in studio C on Thurs at 4 pm as long as a board member is here.

 

-Need to begin music purchasing for the year:

-MDs should reach out to sub MDs, board members, and other staff for recommendations

-announce at next staff meeting

 

-Next year’s board? 

-Who’s not graduating this year?

 

 

-Ben M Vacation next week

 

 

Tuesday’s Jive

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

 Good afternoon, it’s Tuesday, October 23nd, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Isabelle Gauthier the host of a free form interview show every 1st and 3rd Friday from 1:00-1:30 pm
Now here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:
Tomorrow night at The Buttonwood Tree it’s Karoake with Deni.
Friday, “Woody Sed,” a one-man play performed by Thomas Jones, portrays the life, times and music of the great American folk hero, Woody Guthrie.
Saturday, Sirius Coyote, a multi-talented group of musicians, storytellers and instrument makers, performs on more than thirty different  ancient  and modern  instruments of the Americas. This performance will focus on one of Latin America’s most important holidays, DIA DE  LOS MUERTOS, the Day of the Dead (November 1st and 2nd) , a festive celebration to honor the dearly departed.
Every Sunday at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood, Food Not Bombs shares vegetarian food. All are welcome. You are also invited to help prepare the meal at the First Church at 190 Court Street at 11:30 am.
Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on their website at www.buttonwood.org.
On Wednesday afternoon at Wesleyan University, there will be an exhibition opening reception and talk, “Saved from Europe: The Kallir Family Collection of Austrian and German Literature,” in the Smith Reading Room at Olin Memorial Library, 252 Church Street.
 Also on Wednesday afternoon, Wesleyan’s Music & Public Life series continues with a performance by John Troutman of “In Honolulu – There is Music Everywhere: Making Meaning of Hawaiian Guitar Culture in the Era of the Overthrow.” In rehearsal hall 003, the Daltry room.
On Wednesday night, poet/performer/librettist Douglas Kearney reads at Wesleyan’s Russell House at 8 pm
Thursday’s Performance Now film series at Wesleyan brings “The Films of Jesper Just,” a Danish artist using 3-D technology. The film will be at Film Studies 190, the Powell Family Cinema.
Sunday, the Music & Public Life series brings Los Trovadores de America to Iguanas Ranas restaurant, 484 Main Street, Middletown.
For more information, visit Wesleyan.edu/mpl
Over at Russell Library on Wednesday evening, author Saloma Miller Furlong will give a talk titled “Why I Left the Amish,”  based on her book of that name.
Down in New Haven at Toad’s Place tomorrow night, it’s the weekly EDM Night, with DJ HighLife & DJ JiggaWompz.
Thursday brings Walk Off the Earth, with special guests Julia Nunes and the Mowgli’s.
Friday, it’s Skalapalooza 2012, with Spring Heeled Jack, The Pietasters, The Pilfers, the Hardcore Karaoke Pile-On Extravaganza, and Sgt. Scagnetti.
Saturday brings The Original Saturday Night Dance Party, a Halloween costume party with prizes awarded in multiple categories.
Then Sunday, it’s Capleton & The Prophecy Band.
More at toadsplace.com.
Over at Café Nine in New Haven, tonight brings Nickle P presents a Connecticut indie/hip hop showcase.
Wednesday, Fake Four Inc. presents  Ceschi & Anonymous Inc.; w/ Louis Logic; Sketch Tha Cataclysm & DJ Mo Niklz; and Child Actor.
Thursday, it’s the Coney Island Rock  & Roll Roadshow Fall Tour Kickoff,  featuring the Arkhams and  special guests Tigress.
Friday’s happy hour features Solin, followed at 9 by Lipgloss Crisis Presents: a  Halloween/Day of the Dead Burlesque Show, with special guest host Hors D’oeuvers from Northampton, a spooky evening of burlesque and games. Prizes for best costumes.
On Saturday, it’s the Afternoon Jazz Jam w/ host George Baker, followed by a Punk Rock Halloween Party, featuring the Hulls; LA Trash; and Pickpocket.  Come as your favorite ’70s punk icon!
Sunday, it’s the Sunday After Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars.
More at cafenine.com.
Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight is Jazz Monday.
Tonight brings Michael Palin’s Other Orchestra, an 18-piece band, to Sally’s.
Wednesday, it’s the Blues Jam, with this week’s host Tommy Whalen.
Then Friday, Anthony Gomes, a Canadian-born blues musician and rocker, returns to Sally’s stage for a night of guitar pyrotechnics.
On Saturday, the Kortchmar/McDonald Band plays. Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar is a guitarist, session musician, and songwriter who’s worked with such icons as David Crosby, Carole King, Graham Nash, Carly Simon and James Taylor, helping define the signature sound of the singer-songwriter era of the 1970s. Jackson Browne and Don Henley have recorded many songs written or co-written by Kortchmar, and Kortchmar was Henley’s partner in the 1980s.
More at blackeyedsallys.com.
Back in Middletown, the Fall 2012 Community Record Fair, sponsored by your favorite radio station, WESU, will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Beckham Hall, 45 Wyllys Ave. Vendors will be selling new and used music in all formats — plus, there’ll be food, games, WESU merch, and, best of all, WESU DJ’s spinning vinyl all day! Learn more at wesufm.org.
Now here’s what going on in cinema off the beaten path in central Connecticut:
At Real Art Ways, “Bill W.” and “Detropia” continue through Thursday
On Friday and Saturday, the film “How to Survive a Plague” is screened, followed by the “It’s Such a Beautiful Day Trilogy,” both running into next week.
Then on Sunday afternoon, the Story of Film: An Odyssey continues with part 3, “Postwar Cinema” (1940s); “Sex & Melodrama” (1950s).
More at realartways.com
Tonight  at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s movie theater, it’s “Keep the Lights On,” Ira Sachs’s semi-autobiographical film about his decade-long, loving, erotic, destructive love affair in New York City.
Wednesday through Saturday, it’s “Magic Mike,” a film about male strippers that the Boston Globe described as (quote) “so much better than it needs to be that it’s sick.”
Saturday also brings “PixELATION,” a benefit celebrating Cinestudio’s newly installed 4k digital cinema –and the culmination of its FutureCinema Campaign. Join fellow film lovers for a 6 pm reception with food & prizes, and a 7 pm screening of “Hugo,” Martin Scorsese’s 2011 award-winning homage to cinema,  The film will be followed at 9:15 by a lively panel discussion moderated by WNPR’s Colin McEnroe.
Sunday begins three days of screenings of “Robot and Frank,” a film set in the not-too-distant-future. Frank, a lonely widower, is starting to worry his two children. Their solution is to purchase a help robot that will monitor Frank in his own home. Frank Langella gives a complex and intelligent performance.
Details at cinestudio.org
Now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s Finding Bliss:
words and music with DJ Lauren “Bliss” Agnelli, an interview, free-form talk show about people who are collowing their hearts and living authentically.
From 6-6:30 is Free Speech Radio news from the Pacifica Network, your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting.
From 6:30-8:00 is Acoustic Blender with Bill Revill, an eclectic selection of Americana, country with root influence.
From 8-9pm is The Voice of the CITY with J-Cherry, your source for live and local Connecticut arts and music at its best.
From 9-10:30 is Wonderland with DJ Cheshire Cat, he writes in, Ive got a song in my heart, a chemical imbalance in my head, and a musical library at my fingers. From krautrock to post-rock, grunge to garage, novelty to New Romantic, punk to prog, Wonderland has a place for it.
From 10:30-11:30 is Record Roulette with Avery, featuring random, risky vynl
From 11:30pm-12:30 am is Hardly Strictly Bluegrass with DJ Sleepy Girl, the dulcet tones of bluegrass and folk–just not entirely.
Wednesday, 12:30-1:30am is the Boss with DJ Moe bringing you Bruce Springsteen: revered, remembered and relived
Wednesday, 1:30-2:30am is Six Degrees of Separation with Monica Kornis

And that’s all for today’s Jive At Five. Tune in each weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.
The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at wesufm.org/jive

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening!

CMJ Dispatches, Pt. II

After three years toiling in anonymity, sifting the hidden gems from the, at times, overwhelming pile of mediocre CDs constantly being sent into our station, and holding painful conversations with promoters about how that White Boy Wasted record is doing, being a Music Director has finally paid off in a big way. In these five days of CMJ, I’ve seen some of the best concerts of my life, met some awe-inspiring musicians, and overall, had a ball. After spending a day and a half at Wesleyan, I trekked back to New York on Friday through 3 1/2 hours of some of the worst traffic I’ve ever had to deal with (it involved bewildering drives through Greenwich and the Bronx). Again, this was all worth it because of CMJ.

Day IV: Friday

My first stop on Friday was a non-CMJ event, the Third Man Record Truck at the Ace Hotel. Third Man Records is Jack White‘s music label, which puts out a ton of strange, awesome releases by the likes of Tom Jones, Conan O’Brien and, most bizarrely awesome, a cover of Mozart‘s scatology-themed piece “Leck Mich Im Arsch” by Insane Clown Posse (In case you weren’t familiar with Mozart’s poop-obsession, there is, quite helpfully, a rather long and detailed Wikipedia article on “Mozart and Scatology”). Third Man’s Record Truck operates much like a food truck, except that it sells records out its window. There I picked up a vinyl copy of The White Stripes‘ classic early single “The Big Three Killed My Baby.”

Next up, I met up with Adam and my friend Timmy at the Gramercy Theater for the Mass Appeal CMJ Take Over. The line for the event stretched around two sides of the block. While waiting in line, we met a Russian chainsmoker named Vlad, who told us we could buy a tank in Russia for 60 grand. This showcase was a hip-hop show, which reflected to some extent the current diversity of styles and content in the genre. Since the show was free, a large portion of the crowd seemed to be there just to see something free without any prior knowledge of the acts. Also, Asher Roth was the headliner, despite there being at least 6-7 more talented/respected acts on the bill. So while this show displayed plenty of what makes hip-hop, in my opinion, the most exciting, interesting genre around these days, this was far from a perfect concert, and there was plenty of bland, mediocre, and down-right terrible rap on display.

Starting things off was Alexander Spit, about whom there is little to be said, except that he wore pre-torn jeans and raps over obnoxious beats. Following him came Bodega Bamz, a rapper from Spanish Harlem, who has put out tracks with the likes of A$AP Ferg, Joell Ortiz and Flatbush Zombies, who came out for his last song on stage. His set was a definite breath of fresh air after Spit’s, but while his rhymes were serviceable and his beat-selection decent, he appeared to be merely a mid-level talent in the grand scheme of today’s rapidly expanding rap game.

Next up came Angel Haze, who released an excellent debut EP, Reservation this summer. Obvious comparisons have and will be made between her and the two biggest female rappers of the day, Azealia Banks and Nikki Minaj. Haze, however seems more interested in simply spitting fire than in the more schtick-y aspects of both Banks and Minaj. She had great stage presence, finally managing to get the lethargic crowd somewhat interested in what was going on on-stage. And she rocked a tube-top/crucifix outfit. I came out a big fan. Following Haze came Troy Ave, a street rapper who took his name from the street he grew up on in Crown Heights. Vice informs us that he “owns a grey Jeep and at least one gun.” Like Bodega, Troy Ave is another mid-level talent, who can rock a mic without embarrassing himself, but lacks any defining characteristic to push him to the next level. The most memorable part of his set was him leading the crowd in several chants of “Powder!” The next act, Ninjasonik made me almost nostalgic for Alexander Spit. When you look up the word “wack” in the dictionary, there should be a recording of this band performing their terrible pop-rap over that Matt and Kim song that your annoying co-worker has as her ringtone. Following their set, a fight broke out between a rather inebriated girl, who took offense with the young man next to her for not even being from Brooklyn. It was far classier than Ninjasonik.

There could hardly be a starker contrast than there was between Ninjasonik’s embarassing soft-as-a-lamb-rap and the sinister, coolheaded, wildly inventive Boldy James, about whom I can only gush as an unabashed fanboy. Boldy James is the kind of talent who should be spoken of in hushed tones by anyone who cares about rap as an artform. At this point, he is still relatively unknown, though well respected among true hip-hop fanatics, having collaborated on many tracks with Chuck Inglish and Sir Michael Rocks of The Cool Kids, as well as appearing on this summer’s posthumously-released J. Dilla comp, and working on a soon-to-be-released album with The Alchemist. I first became a massive Boldy fan when I heard the track “Life Time” off his debut 2011 mixtape, Trapper’s Alley – Pros and Cons: The Quikcrete Ready Mixtape. The song samples the hauntingly beautiful “Here’s to Life” by Shirley Horn and is perhaps the most vivid description of what it’s like to be in prison I’ve ever heard. It also features a virtuosic section in which Boldy recites a seemingly endless list of friends in jail, with names like “Slick Rick, Stank Mo, Marley and Blaylock.” Though it might not be out of the usual for a rapper to talk about serving time, Boldy has a way with words and a use of alliteration that is pretty unparalleled. I found an interview with Boldy on the blog Nothing Can Save You, in which he replies to the question, “Are you eating strictly off music now or is music a side hustle?” by saying, “In between the tic tocs of door knocks, rain drops, & gun shot’s, 3 hot’s & a cott, while runnin from the cops. Rap don’t feed me, so I eat from doin other things. It’s not a hustle yet it’s just something that I love to do whether I get paid for it or not. I look at it as therapy & I’m my own personal psychiatrist.” From that point on, I couldn’t get enough of the man. His set did not disappoint, featuring some of my personal favorites, “Home Invasion” and “I Sold Dope All My Life,” as well as his recent Inglish-collab “For the Birds.”

Mr. Muthafuckin’ eXquire showed up next, putting on a crowd-pleasing high-energy show. It was my third time seeing eXquire and I don’t think I’ll be getting tired of seeing him any time soon. After the show I met his masked DJ, who told me that their show at Wesleyan last year was the moment when they knew they had made it. He also let me in on plans to jump on stage during an indie rock show at NYU.

Last up for us was Roc Marciano, a veteran MC from Long Island, who was once a member of Busta Rhymes’ Flipmode Squad and collaborated with Gangrene (Oh No & The Alchemist) on last year’s excellent Greneberg EP. He had good stage presence despite his low-key, icy delivery. As seen in the photo above, a large man in a Long Island hat carried Roc’s drink for him during the set, and another mysterious white guy wearing a cross, beret, leather jacket, sunglasses, and one black glove rocked out next to him. This is a good example of why you can safely say that rock is generally a less interesting genre than rap these days. Action Bronson, the big bearded man in the red hat next to Roc, came out for the last song, “Pouches of Tuna” off Bronson’s Blue Chips mixtape. He received, by far, the biggest crowd reaction of the night and threw several blunts into the audience. Again, when’s the last time you went to an indie rock concert like this? We headed out before Large Professor, The Alchemist, Prodigy and Asher Roth played their sets, having already taken in 4 1/2 hours of hip-hop.

Day V: Saturday

Saturday started with a return to Piano’s where Adam and I checked out Foxygen, a group who is quickly becoming my favorite new band. They released a great debut EP, Take The Kids Off Broadway this summer and seem poised for very big things. They look and sound like they were transported by a time machine from the ’70s and their lead singer even yelled out some endearingly bemused comments about the Internet. Pitchfork ran a snarky, meanspirited article about the band’s earlier performance at CMJ, written by Carrie Battan, who also managed to call Lil B‘s recent excellent, hilarious mixtape Obama Basedgod “downright boring, joyless, and indistinguishable from hours upon hours of the rapper’s throwaway material.” Seriously, “United States of Thuggin’” is boring and joyless?! I must experience joy and boredom in a very different way from this lady. Here’s what she wrote about Foxygen: “These kids are nothing if not serious students of their parents’ record collections, and their live show read like a mid-aughts Battle of the Bands at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest. Luckily for them, there’s no shortage of nostalgics hungry for their brand of sturdy, boilerplate psych and glam-rock tunes.” Ouch. While it’s true that Foxygen clearly are serious students of music history, I see this less as something to make fun of than to celebrate. Shouldn’t we want our young musicians to care about what came before them? And I must disagree with her characterization of their music as “boilerplate.” While the band comes from a lineage of fuzzy, exuberant psych/glam/garage rock, they have crafted their own distinctive sound. Additionally, the hilarious stage banter of their lead singer Sam France, and the clear fact that they’re having the most goddamn fun when they’re on stage sets them apart from any band I’ve ever seen live.

After Foxygen’s set at Piano’s, Adam went off to Brooklyn to watch his sister in a play. I met up with Mara of Lyons Den at DROM where we saw Boldy James for my second time. Outside the venue, I overheard one concertgoer tell his friend, “I go, ‘Is it CMJ down here?’ And he goes, ‘Yeah, but it’s hip hop.’” Boldy put on another excellent show to a sparse crowd, and won over Mara as a fan, who dubbed him “the hipster Jay-Z.” After the show, I got to say hi to Boldy and was, far and away, the most star-struck I had been during CMJ. We agreed that he seemed like a genuinely good guy, whom we’d love to hang out with.

We capped off our CMJ experience with the most fun show of the week, another set by Foxygen, this time at Fuzz NYC, an unmarked venue in Chinatown, which reminded me of the exclusive day spa in Zoolander, so exclusive no one knows about it. Bizarre karaoke videos for Lady Gaga, Whitney Houston, Madonna and some Japanese singers played on projectors behind the band. Foxygen rocked out and the audience was very receptive. All the band members are about 5’5,” but they make a hell of a lot of racket for some little people. They also slowed things down for a Suede cover. Sam France yelled out things like “This song goes out to the Teletubbies!” “Who here’s on mushrooms?” “I’m in love… with a milk cow!” In short, a perfect way to end a terrific week in New York.

CMJ Dispatches, Pt. II

After three years toiling in anonymity, sifting the hidden gems from the, at times, overwhelming pile of mediocre CDs constantly being sent into our station, and holding painful conversations with promoters about how that White Boy Wasted record is doing, being a Music Director has finally paid off in a big way. In these five days of CMJ, I’ve seen some of the best concerts of my life, met some awe-inspiring musicians, and overall, had a ball. After spending a day and a half at Wesleyan, I trekked back to New York on Friday through 3 1/2 hours of some of the worst traffic I’ve ever had to deal with (it involved bewildering drives through Greenwich and the Bronx). Again, this was all worth it because of CMJ.

Day IV: Friday

My first stop on Friday was a non-CMJ event, the Third Man Record Truck at the Ace Hotel. Third Man Records is Jack White‘s music label, which puts out a ton of strange, awesome releases by the likes of Tom Jones, Conan O’Brien and, most bizarrely awesome, a cover of Mozart‘s scatology-themed piece “Leck Mich Im Arsch” by Insane Clown Posse (In case you weren’t familiar with Mozart’s poop-obsession, there is, quite helpfully, a rather long and detailed Wikipedia article on “Mozart and Scatology”). Third Man’s Record Truck operates much like a food truck, except that it sells records out its window. There I picked up a vinyl copy of The White Stripes‘ classic early single “The Big Three Killed My Baby.”

Next up, I met up with Adam and my friend Timmy at the Gramercy Theater for the Mass Appeal CMJ Take Over. The line for the event stretched around two sides of the block. While waiting in line, we met a Russian chainsmoker named Vlad, who told us we could buy a tank in Russia for 60 grand. This showcase was a hip-hop show, which reflected to some extent the current diversity of styles and content in the genre. Since the show was free, a large portion of the crowd seemed to be there just to see something free without any prior knowledge of the acts. Also, Asher Roth was the headliner, despite there being at least 6-7 more talented/respected acts on the bill. So while this show displayed plenty of what makes hip-hop, in my opinion, the most exciting, interesting genre around these days, this was far from a perfect concert, and there was plenty of bland, mediocre, and down-right terrible rap on display.

Starting things off was Alexander Spit, about whom there is little to be said, except that he wore pre-torn jeans and raps over obnoxious beats. Following him came Bodega Bamz, a rapper from Spanish Harlem, who has put out tracks with the likes of A$AP Ferg, Joell Ortiz and Flatbush Zombies, who came out for his last song on stage. His set was a definite breath of fresh air after Spit’s, but while his rhymes were serviceable and his beat-selection decent, he appeared to be merely a mid-level talent in the grand scheme of today’s rapidly expanding rap game.

Next up came Angel Haze, who released an excellent debut EP, Reservation this summer. Obvious comparisons have and will be made between her and the two biggest female rappers of the day, Azealia Banks and Nikki Minaj. Haze, however seems more interested in simply spitting fire than in the more schtick-y aspects of both Banks and Minaj. She had great stage presence, finally managing to get the lethargic crowd somewhat interested in what was going on on-stage. And she rocked a tube-top/crucifix outfit. I came out a big fan. Following Haze came Troy Ave, a street rapper who took his name from the street he grew up on in Crown Heights. Vice informs us that he “owns a grey Jeep and at least one gun.” Like Bodega, Troy Ave is another mid-level talent, who can rock a mic without embarrassing himself, but lacks any defining characteristic to push him to the next level. The most memorable part of his set was him leading the crowd in several chants of “Powder!” The next act, Ninjasonik made me almost nostalgic for Alexander Spit. When you look up the word “wack” in the dictionary, there should be a recording of this band performing their terrible pop-rap over that Matt and Kim song that your annoying co-worker has as her ringtone. Following their set, a fight broke out between a rather inebriated girl, who took offense with the young man next to her for not even being from Brooklyn. It was far classier than Ninjasonik.

There could hardly be a starker contrast than there was between Ninjasonik’s embarassing soft-as-a-lamb-rap and the sinister, coolheaded, wildly inventive Boldy James, about whom I can only gush as an unabashed fanboy. Boldy James is the kind of talent who should be spoken of in hushed tones by anyone who cares about rap as an artform. At this point, he is still relatively unknown, though well respected among true hip-hop fanatics, having collaborated on many tracks with Chuck Inglish and Sir Michael Rocks of The Cool Kids, as well as appearing on this summer’s posthumously-released J. Dilla comp, and working on a soon-to-be-released album with The Alchemist. I first became a massive Boldy fan when I heard the track “Life Time” off his debut 2011 mixtape, Trapper’s Alley – Pros and Cons: The Quikcrete Ready Mixtape. The song samples the hauntingly beautiful “Here’s to Life” by Shirley Horn and is perhaps the most vivid description of what it’s like to be in prison I’ve ever heard. It also features a virtuosic section in which Boldy recites a seemingly endless list of friends in jail, with names like “Slick Rick, Stank Mo, Marley and Blaylock.” Though it might not be out of the usual for a rapper to talk about serving time, Boldy has a way with words and a use of alliteration that is pretty unparalleled. I found an interview with Boldy on the blog Nothing Can Save You, in which he replies to the question, “Are you eating strictly off music now or is music a side hustle?” by saying, “In between the tic tocs of door knocks, rain drops, & gun shot’s, 3 hot’s & a cott, while runnin from the cops. Rap don’t feed me, so I eat from doin other things. It’s not a hustle yet it’s just something that I love to do whether I get paid for it or not. I look at it as therapy & I’m my own personal psychiatrist.” From that point on, I couldn’t get enough of the man. His set did not disappoint, featuring some of my personal favorites, “Home Invasion” and “I Sold Dope All My Life,” as well as his recent Inglish-collab “For the Birds.”

Mr. Muthafuckin’ eXquire showed up next, putting on a crowd-pleasing high-energy show. It was my third time seeing eXquire and I don’t think I’ll be getting tired of seeing him any time soon. After the show I met his masked DJ, who told me that their show at Wesleyan last year was the moment when they knew they had made it. He also let me in on plans to jump on stage during an indie rock show at NYU.

Last up for us was Roc Marciano, a veteran MC from Long Island, who was once a member of Busta Rhymes’ Flipmode Squad and collaborated with Gangrene (Oh No & The Alchemist) on last year’s excellent Greneberg EP. He had good stage presence despite his low-key, icy delivery. As seen in the photo above, a large man in a Long Island hat carried Roc’s drink for him during the set, and another mysterious white guy wearing a cross, beret, leather jacket, sunglasses, and one black glove rocked out next to him. This is a good example of why you can safely say that rock is generally a less interesting genre than rap these days. Action Bronson, the big bearded man in the red hat next to Roc, came out for the last song, “Pouches of Tuna” off Bronson’s Blue Chips mixtape. He received, by far, the biggest crowd reaction of the night and threw several blunts into the audience. Again, when’s the last time you went to an indie rock concert like this? We headed out before Large Professor, The Alchemist, Prodigy and Asher Roth played their sets, having already taken in 4 1/2 hours of hip-hop.

Day V: Saturday

Saturday started with a return to Piano’s where Adam and I checked out Foxygen, a group who is quickly becoming my favorite new band. They released a great debut EP, Take The Kids Off Broadway this summer and seem poised for very big things. They look and sound like they were transported by a time machine from the ’70s and their lead singer even yelled out some endearingly bemused comments about the Internet. Pitchfork ran a snarky, meanspirited article about the band’s earlier performance at CMJ, written by Carrie Battan, who also managed to call Lil B‘s recent excellent, hilarious mixtape Obama Basedgod “downright boring, joyless, and indistinguishable from hours upon hours of the rapper’s throwaway material.” Seriously, “United States of Thuggin’” is boring and joyless?! I must experience joy and boredom in a very different way from this lady. Here’s what she wrote about Foxygen: “These kids are nothing if not serious students of their parents’ record collections, and their live show read like a mid-aughts Battle of the Bands at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest. Luckily for them, there’s no shortage of nostalgics hungry for their brand of sturdy, boilerplate psych and glam-rock tunes.” Ouch. While it’s true that Foxygen clearly are serious students of music history, I see this less as something to make fun of than to celebrate. Shouldn’t we want our young musicians to care about what came before them? And I must disagree with her characterization of their music as “boilerplate.” While the band comes from a lineage of fuzzy, exuberant psych/glam/garage rock, they have crafted their own distinctive sound. Additionally, the hilarious stage banter of their lead singer Sam France, and the clear fact that they’re having the most goddamn fun when they’re on stage sets them apart from any band I’ve ever seen live.

After Foxygen’s set at Piano’s, Adam went off to Brooklyn to watch his sister in a play. I met up with Mara of Lyons Den at DROM where we saw Boldy James for my second time. Outside the venue, I overheard one concertgoer tell his friend, “I go, ‘Is it CMJ down here?’ And he goes, ‘Yeah, but it’s hip hop.’” Boldy put on another excellent show to a sparse crowd, and won over Mara as a fan, who dubbed him “the hipster Jay-Z.” After the show, I got to say hi to Boldy and was, far and away, the most star-struck I had been during CMJ. We agreed that he seemed like a genuinely good guy, whom we’d love to hang out with.

We capped off our CMJ experience with the most fun show of the week, another set by Foxygen, this time at Fuzz NYC, an unmarked venue in Chinatown, which reminded me of the exclusive day spa in Zoolander, so exclusive no one knows about it. Bizarre karaoke videos for Lady Gaga, Whitney Houston, Madonna and some Japanese singers played on projectors behind the band. Foxygen rocked out and the audience was very receptive. All the band members are about 5’5,” but they make a hell of a lot of racket for some little people. They also slowed things down for a Suede cover. Sam Franceyelled out things like “This song goes out to the Teletubbies!” “Who here’s on mushrooms?” “I’m in love… with a milk cow!” In short, a perfect way to end a terrific week in New York.

Mon., Oct. 22 Jive


 Good afternoon, it’s Monday, October 22nd, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Maria Johnson, host of “Reasonably Catholic: Keeping the Faith,” airing (and streaming) at 4 pm every 1st, 3rd and, when there is one, 5th, Tuesday here at WESU. The next episode, on Oct. 30, will feature women priests. Check out reasonablycatholic.com for archived audio of previous shows.
Now here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:
Tonight at The Buttonwood Tree, it’s the Anything Goes open mic night.Wednesday, it’s Karoake with Deni.
Friday, “Woody Sed,” a one-man play performed by Thomas Jones, portrays the life, times and music of the great American folk hero, Woody Guthrie.
Saturday, Sirius Coyote, a multi-talented group of musicians, storytellers and instrument makers, performs on more than thirty different  ancient  and modern  instruments of the Americas. This performance will focus on one of Latin America’s most important holidays, DIA DE MUERTOS, the Day of the Dead (November 1st and 2nd) , a festive celebration to honor the dearly departed.
Every Sunday at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood, Food Not Bombs shares vegetarian food. All are welcome. You are also invited to help prepare the meal at the First Church at 190 Court Street at 11:30 am.
Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on their website at www.buttonwood.org.
On Wednesday afternoon at Wesleyan University, there will be an exhibition opening reception and talk, “Saved from Europe: The Kallir Family Collection of Austrian and German Literature,” in the Smith Reading Room at Olin Memorial Library, 252 Church Street.
 Also on Wednesday afternoon, Wesleyan’s Music & Public Life series continues with a performance by John Troutman of “In Honolulu – There is Music Everywhere: Making Meaning of Hawaiian Guitar Culture in the Era of the Overthrow.” In rehearsal hall 003, the Daltry room.
On Wednesday night, poet/performer/librettist Douglas Kearney reads at Wesleyan’s Russell House.
Thursday’s Performance Now film series at Wesleyan brings “The Films of Jesper Just,” a Danish artist using 3-D technology, to Film Studies 190, the Powell Family Cinema.
Sunday, the Music & Public Life series brings Los Trovadores de America to Iguanas Ranas restaurant, 484 Main Street, Middletown.
For more information, visit Wesleyan.edu.
Over at Russell Library on Wednesday evening, author Saloma Miller Furlong will give a talk titled “Why I Left the Amish,”  based on her book of that name.
Down in New Haven at Toad’s Place tonight, it’s A Night of Smooth Jazz with Rohn Lawrence & Friends.
Wednesday, it’s the weekly EDM Night, with DJ HighLife & DJ JiggaWompz.
Thursday brings Walk Off the Earth, with special guests Julia Nunes and the Mowgli’s.
Friday, it’s Skalapalooza 2012, with Spring Heeled Jack, The Pietasters, The Pilfers, the Hardcore Karaoke Pile-On Extravaganza, and Sgt. Scagnetti.
Saturday brings The Original Saturday Night Dance Party, a Halloween costume party with prizes awarded in multiple categories.
Then Sunday, it’s Capleton & The Prophecy Band.
More at toadsplace.com.
Over at Café Nine in New Haven, tonight brings a special Monday show: Vicki & the Vengents; w/ The Shoutbacks .
Tomorrow, Nickle P presents a Connecticut indie/hip hop showcase.
Wednesday, Fake Four Inc. presents  Ceschi & Anonymous Inc.; w/ Louis Logic; Sketch Tha Cataclysm & DJ Mo Niklz; and Child Actor.
Thursday, it’s the Coney Island Rock  & Roll Roadshow Fall Tour Kickoff,  featuring the Arkhams and  special guests Tigress.
Friday’s happy hour features Solin, followed at 9 by Lipgloss Crisis Presents: a  Halloween/Day of the Dead Burlesque Show, with special guest host Hors D’oeuvers from Northampton, a spooky evening of burlesque and games. Prizes for best costumes.
On Saturday, it’s the Afternoon Jazz Jam w/ host George Baker, followed by a Punk Rock Halloween Party, featuring the Hulls; LA Trash; and Pickpocket.  Come as your favorite ’70s punk icon!
Sunday, it’s the Sunday After Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars.
More at cafenine.com.
Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight is Jazz Monday.
Tomorrow brings Michael Palin’s Other Orchestra, an 18-piece band, to Sally’s.
Wednesday, it’s the Blues Jam, with this week’s host Tommy Whalen.
Then Friday, Anthony Gomes, a Canadian-born blues musician and rocker, returns to Sally’s stage for a night of guitar pyrotechnics.
On Saturday, the Kortchmar/McDonald Band plays. Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar is a guitarist, session musician, and songwriter who’s worked with such icons as David Crosby, Carole King, Graham Nash, Carly Simon and James Taylor, helping define the signature sound of the singer-songwriter era of the 1970s. Jackson Browne and Don Henley have recorded many songs written or co-written by Kortchmar, and Kortchmar was Henley’s partner in the 1980s.
More at blackeyedsallys.com.
Back in Middletown, the Fall 2012 Community Record Fair, sponsored by your favorite radio station, WESU, will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Beckham Hall, 45 Wyllys Ave. Vendors will be selling new and used music in all formats — plus, there’ll be food, games, WESU merch, and, best of all, WESU DJ’s spinning vinyl all day! Learn more at wesufm.org.
Now here’s what going on in cinema off the beaten path in central Connecticut:
At Real Art Ways, “Bill W.” and “Detropia” continue through Thursday, with a special added event tonight: the Presidential debate shown on the big screen. The café opens at 5, with the debate beginning at 9.
On Friday and Saturday, the film “How to Survive a Plague” is screened, followed by the “It’s Such a Beautiful Day Trilogy,” both running into next week.
Then on Sunday afternoon, the Story of Film: An Odyssey continues with part 3, “Postwar Cinema” (1940s); “Sex & Melodrama” (1950s).
More at realartways.com
Tonight  and tomorrow at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s movie theater, it’s “Keep the Lights On,” Ira Sachs’s semi-autobiographical film about his decade-long, loving, erotic, destructive love affair in New York City.
Wednesday through Saturday, it’s “Magic Mike,” a film about male strippers that the Boston Globe described as (quote) “so much better than it needs to be that it’s sick.” 
Saturday also brings “PixELATION,” a benefit celebrating Cinestudio’s newly installed 4k digital cinema –and the culmination of its FutureCinema Campaign. Join fellow film lovers for a 6 pm reception with food & prizes, and a 7 pm screening of “Hugo,” Martin Scorsese’s 2011 award-winning homage to cinema,  The film will be followed at 9:15 by a lively panel discussion moderated by WNPR’s Colin McEnroe.
Sunday begins three days of screenings of “Robot and Frank,” a film set in the not-too-distant-future. Frank, a lonely widower, is starting to worry his two children. Their solution is to purchase a help robot that will monitor Frank in his own home. Frank Langella gives a complex and intelligent performance.
Details at cinestudio.org
Now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive At Five, from 5:05 to 6:00 pm, it’s Afternoon Jazz with Charles Henry, a well-rounded jazz show for true jazz heads.
Then, from 6-6:30pm, it’s Free Speech Radio News, your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.
From 6:30-8, it’s 75% Folk with Michael Benson, a serving of contemporary folk and acoustic music.
Then from 8-9:30, it’s Anvil Isle with Nate, a musical monsoon.
From 9:30-11:30, it’s The Attention Deficit Disk Jockey with Lee, the music of yesterday’s future today.
From 11:30 pm-12:30 am, stay tuned forThe Noisy Wheelbarrow with Zach Schonfeld and DJ Meat Pie, merging noise rock with poetry and verse.
Then from 12:30-1:30 am, it’s Bazaar Sounds with Mac Taylor, highlighting a different country and corresponding underground/experimental music scene every week.
From 1:30-2:30 am, it’s Live From The Paris Hotel with The Sparrow, a mercurial mixture of pop music and poetry.
Then from 2:30 to 3:30 a.m., it’s Maximum Rock and Roll Radio, featuring the best DIY punk, garage rock and hardcore.
From  3:30-4am, DJ Vegetable Reads Missed Connections: You’ve lost someone. Let’s find them.
That’s followed by the BBC World News from 4-5am, your chance to hear about the day’s news from the famous British news network.
Then it’s Morning Edition from National Public Radio at 5, a daily offering of news and information from NPR.
And that does it for today’s Jive at Five. The script of what you’ve heard is online at wesufm.org/jive.
If you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening! Now stay tuned for Charles Henry.

Homelessness Marathon – Sunday October 21, 2012

WESU is bringing the marathon to you live on Sunday October 21st from 10am-6pm EST. Regular Sunday programming will return next week. Please check out the Homelessness Marathon’s website here for more information.

The Homelessness Marathon is partnering with 7 radio stations around the United States. We will hear reports from Illinois, Maine, Indiana, New Mexico, Vermont, New Hampshire, Oregon and New York. Topics will range from “When you are forced to leave home” to the Vice-Presidential candidates. Please tune-in.

Homelessness Marathon – Sunday October 21, 2012

WESU is bringing the marathon to you live on Sunday October 21st from 10am-6pm EST. Regular Sunday programming will return next week. Please check out the Homelessness Marathon’s website here for more information.

The Homelessness Marathon is partnering with 7 radio stations around the United States. We will hear reports from Illinois, Maine, Indiana, New Mexico, Vermont, New Hampshire, Oregon and New York. Topics will range from “When you are forced to leave home” to the Vice-Presidential candidates. Please tune-in.

Friday’s Jive 10-19-12

Good afternoon, it’s Friday, October 19th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and run down of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Stephan Allison, host of River Valley Rhythms heard Thursdays at 4 pm here at WESU. Thanks for tuning in.

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For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org

Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:

Tonight at The Buttonwood Tree, enjoy the “Talking to Walls’ Acoustic Rock Concert,” in which British arena rock meets American garage & indie – opening the evening is singer/songwriter Alma. Saturday night, guitarist Gale Wade performs an evocative mélange of Americana, bluegrass and blues, accompanied by Steve Wade, also on guitar. Every Sunday at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood, Food Not Bombs shares vegetarian food. All are welcome. You are also invited to help prepare the meal at the First Church at 190 Court Street at 11:30 am. Also, there will be a Poetry Potluck from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sunday at the Buttonwood. It’s an opportunity for people who enjoy poetry to get together to share and discuss their favorite works. Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on their website at www.buttonwood.org.

It’s Homecoming Weekend at Wesleyan. The 36th annual Navaratri Festival is now in full swing.  The festival concerts will be on Friday, Saturday and Sunday night in either Crowell Concert Hall or World Music Hall. Details at www.wesleyan.edu/cfa

This evening at 7 “An Eye for an Eye: an Open Reading” will bring to Wesleyan’s Memorial Chapel a play by 2012 Graduate Liberal Studies Program alumna Linda Napoletano. The play tells the story of Bangladeshi immigrant Rais Bhuiyan [RACE BOO-yawn], who was shot in the face in the wake of the September 11th World Trade Center attacks. After recovering from his injuries, the victim fought to save the shooter from execution. Mr. Bhuiyan, founder of World Without Hate, will lead a discussion after the reading. This is the second of five events celebrating Graduate Liberal Studies’ 60th year. For more information call 860.685.2900 or go to wesleyan.edu/masters

On Saturday afternoon at 2 in the Zilkha Gallery, the Wesleyan Center for the Arts presents Wesleyan Alums in Performance Art, a free talk by practitioners of that art form.

Also on Saturday afternoon, as part of the university’s Music & Public Life series, a free discussion titled “Pop Music Producers & The Real World — A Dysfunctional Marriage” will bring award-winning songwriter and record producer Carl Sturken, class of ’78, to campus. Mr. Sturken’s career has included making music for such artists as Kelly Clarkson, Christina Aguilera, and Rod Stewart, as well as discovering and signing pop superstar Rihanna. The event will be at 3 p.m. in CFA Hall.

This Saturday, from 10am-4pm, friends of the Wesleyan Library will be having a book sale at Olin Memorial Library, 252 Church Street. There will be over 5,000 academic and popular books, priced from $1-$5. if you would like to volunteer to help with the sale, please email libfriends@wesleyan.edu

Saturday at the Canoe Club, at Harbor Park, the Graham’s Quakers, a quasi-unplugged group with 2 guitars, bass,  vocals, and no drums, will be playing.
Then on Sunday from 5-8pm its Joey Pass and the Three of Us featuring songs from Frank Sinatra, Mel Torme, and Ramsey Lewis.

Shakedown, playing The Dead and beyond is down in New Haven at Toad’s Place tonight. Also performing: Poor Old Shine and Full Spectrum. Also on Friday, it’s Afton Presents with Stealhead, Cloud Zenna, E.M.J., and Lauren G & Guests. More information can be found online at toadsplace.com.

Over at Café Nine in New Haven tonight, the early show will feature Matt Jaffee, followed by The New Dirty; w/ Party Horse. Saturday, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., it’s the Afternoon Jazz Jam w/ host Tony Dioguardi and Friends, followed by Paper Hill Casket Company; w/ Eurisko and Bella’s Bartok. Then Sunday evening, it’s the Sunday-After-Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars. More can be found online at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, the Greg Sherrod Blues Band plays, and then Saturday, it’s Grayson Hugh, a singer/songwriter and master of the piano and Hammond B3 organ. More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now here’s what going on in cinema off the beaten path in central Connecticut:
At Real Art Ways, the film “Detropia”, a dreamlike collage of a documentary about Detroit, is showing. Also, Real Art Ways presents Don Hertzfeldt’s “It’s Such A Beautiful Day Trilogy,” combining the cult animator’s recent “Bill” trilogy of short films into one darkly comedic feature. Then Saturday night, it’s music with Burnt Sugar Does Steely Dan, a rendition of the Steely Dan songbook, taken apart and put back together in two sets live. Then on Sunday afternoon, the Story of Film: An Odyssey continues with part 2, “Expressionism, Impressionism and Surrealism: Golden Age of World Cinema” (1920s); and “The Arrival of Sound” (1930s). More can be found online at realartways.org

Tonight and Saturday at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s movie theater, it’s “The Avengers,” directed by Wesleyan alum Joss Whedon. Then Sunday begins screenings of “Keep the Lights On,” Ira Sachs’s semi-autobiographical film about his decade-long, loving, erotic, destructive love affair in New York City. Details can be found at cinestudio.org
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And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s
 Wild Wild Live with MC Apper

A sneak peek into the magical live music scene of Wes. Tune in for in-station sets from campus bands and recordings of up-and-coming artists’ campus shows.

From 6:00 to 6:30pm 
it’s Free Speech Radio News – Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.

For the next half hour, until 7pm you have the Middletown Youth Radio Project – A weekly radio program featuring the thoughts, voices, creativity and talent of the kids in the WESU neighborhood.

At 7, until 8:30pm we have the Universal Sound Wave with Sistah Tee - Informing listeners about local and global issues with health, nutrition, and stress reduction tips, featuring a wide range of music including African, reggae, gospel, R&B, Latin, and blues.

Next up until 10pm, we take it
 From the Otherside with 
Rok-A-Dee - The Voice of Hartford, including local artists from Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He also features upcoming artists performing Caribbean R & B, Soca and international music.

From 10 until Midnight, take in
 the sounds of Rumba en el Patio 
with Michael
- Classic Salsa for the dancers, Afro-Latin Big Band for the discerning ear. Join us as we adventure through the history of Musica Latina!

At Midnight until 1:30am Saturday it’s 
N.E. Tempo with 
DJ Berk
- Serious turntablism – Dubstep, DnB, techno, ragga jungle, breakbeats mixed live.

At 1:30am we go 
In the Master Bedroom, Under the Bed with 
Dope Dave 
until 3am – Celebrating conscious hip-hop and its offshoots & influences. Acrobatic emcees and down-tempo poets mix it up over varied oceans of sound.

At 3, to 4am it’s the Bassment Beats – the Real Hip-Hop is over here.

Then, we bring you
 Sing Out! 
from 4 to 5am, on a mission to preserve and support the cultural diversity and heritage of all traditional and contemporary folk musics, and to encourage making folk music a part of our everyday lives.

And we bring in the daylight from 5:00 to 6:00am with the 
BBC World News 
- a daily News roundup from the British Broadcasting Corporation

And staying on the other side of the big pond, from 6:00 to 7:00am it’s
 the Celtic Café
 with Pat Laffan and Mark Gallagher presenting traditional and contemporary music with a Celtic connection.

And now that the coffee’s hot enjoy Caffé Italiafrom 7:00 to 8:00am 
with Francesco Fiumara, the former host of WESU’s own WESParla 
 – A weekly roundup of news, music and memories from Italy.

That’s all for today’s Jive At Five, tune in each and every weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.

The Music behind today’s Jive At Five is from Kevin Norton’s Metaphor Quartet, a CD entitled Not Only In That Golden Tree . . . featuring (the late) Wilber Morris, Masahiko Kono, Hitomi Tono’Oka and Kevin Norton, the selection “not drunk, but stunned” and it’s out on clean feed records.

The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at wesufm.org/jive 

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening!