Music Director Picks of the Week #2

Each week, the music directors of WESU, Jesse Brent and Adam Isaacson will be picking out our favorite new releases from the big pile we sort through at the station. Here are four recent records that jumped out at us:

Mountain Goats – Transcendental Youth

The new Mountain Goats album made quite a splash on the blogosphere. Here’s what the Wesleyan Argus had to say: a testament and tribute to the strife of the depressed, the destructive, the addicted, the hopeless and an unflinching and triumphantly empathetic paean that ranks among John Darnielle and company’s best work.” We recommend track #3 (“Cry for Judas”).

Stereo Total – Cactus versus Brezel


Kudos to Forced Exposure for sending this irresistibly fun album from established Franco-German electro pop duo Stereo Total. Their 11th studio album delivers cheesy English lyrics and basic French vocab on top of playful melodies. We recommend the first two tracks (“Jaloux de mon succès”, “Pixelize me”) and more.

Jack of HeartIn Yer Mouth


Where did this band come from? And who did the album art? We know that Jack of Heart hail from somewhere in the south of France, which is surprising enough considering their psych-rock tendencies that hearken back to its heyday – with a little Serge Gainsbourg thrown in for good measure. They sing about Oscar Wilde: awesome. Check out #1, 3 and 4 (“Baby B****”, “Lady Wilde”, “Joh Jett III”). 

Night Moves - Colored Emotions

JB calls Night Moves a more psychedelic My Morning Jacket. The Minneapolis Star Tribune called this album “slow-grooving, neo-twangy, cosmically baked.” Whatever you liken these guys to, be sure to give Colored Emotions a listen. Here’s another great band out of the Twin Cities. Song #1, “Headlights”, could have been on the Drive soundtrack if the movie had been more trippy than brutal. Play the whole dang thing.

Friday Jive 10-12-12

Good afternoon, it’s Friday, October 12th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and run down of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Stephan Allison, host of River Valley Rhythms heard Thursdays at 4 pm here at WESU. Thanks for tuning in.

___________________________________________________________ 
For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org

Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:

This evening, Karaoke with Deni is at The Buttonwood Tree in Middletown, and Saturday, from 1 to 4 p.m., it’s a free afternoon of readings by International Poets – their only Connecticut stop on a whirlwind tour, with live music, an open mic, and a lavish reception with Indian foods. Saturday night, from 8 to 10 p.m., catch “Explorations in Sound,” with Rich McGhee and Margaux Modimo. On Sunday, “Food Not Bombs” shares food in front of the Buttonwood beginning about 1 p.m. All are welcome! Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on its website at www.buttonwood.org.

Over at the Wesleyan Potters gallery shop, through Nov. 2, you can catch “Fibers,” a show of baskets and weavings in the Gallery Shop, visit www.wesleyanpotters.com

With the arrival of fall, farmers’ markets have given way to country fairs, including this one: the Portland Fair on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, on the Exchange Club Grounds, Rte 17A in Portland. Go to www.portlandfair.com for details.

OPENING tonight in New Britain from 6-8pm is the 22nd Annual Fall Carriage House Exhibit presented by the Art League of New Britain. For more info and directions visit www.alnb.org/about.html  


Tonight at Toad’s Place in New Haven, it’s EOTO and Jansten. Sunday evening you can catch Rebelution, Passafire and Through the Roots. More information and details can be found at toadsplace.com.

Over at Café Nine in New Haven tonight, the happy hour features Billy Calash & Friends, followed by Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys. Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted by Gary Grippo and Friends, followed by the Manic Productions presentation of the David Liebe Hart Band of Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show and Adult Swim. Sunday afternoon brings Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School to Café Nine: What do you get when you combine art school and alcohol? A great time and some creative drawings. Come down and enjoy a fun three hours of life drawing. That’s followed at 8 by the Sunday-After-Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Café Nine All-Stars. More info can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, the Eric Gales Band takes the stage. He plays his blues guitar upside-down and left-handed in the style passed down by his grandfather Dempsey Garrett, Sr, who was known to jam with Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. And on Saturday at 9, it’s the Bluegrass Hoedown with three bands for the price of one: Too Blue; Cornfed Dogs; and Chasing Blue. More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the worn-down, over-trodden paths in central CT:

At Real Art Ways, tonight begins seven days of the documentary film “Bill W.,” the story of the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous. Saturday’s screening of “Bill W.” is followed by a one-time showing of “Breaking the Maya Code.” The complex and beautiful Maya hieroglyphic script was until recently the world’s last major undeciphered writing system. Its decoding has unlocked the secrets of one of mankind’s greatest civilizations. That’s followed by “The Room.” Called “the best terrible movie ever,” it’s booked for monthly late shows at Real Art Ways. Then Sunday begins the series, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey.” Prodigious, poetic, and unlike any other “history” of cinema, Mark Cousins’s The Story of Film: An Odyssey is, as the title promises, a thrilling journey. Cousins’s personal voyage—complete with side-trips and retraced steps—is an illuminating, idiosyncratic tour of the emotional and intellectual pleasures of cinema. Offered in 15 weekly chapters, with a combined running time of 15 hours, the film is a treasure trove of clips from films both famous and underappreciated, interviews from a global who’s-who of filmmakers, and passionate, provocative commentary. Sunday’s chapter covers the “Birth of the Cinema” (from 1900–1920); and “The Hollywood Dream” (the 1920s.) More can be found at www.realartways.com.

Tonight at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s movie theater,  screenings of “Beasts of the Southern Wild” begin. Armed with a 16mm camera and a limited budget, a New Orleans collective of filmmakers took off for a Louisiana bayou to make a movie (with non-professional actors) about a 6-year-old girl named Hushpuppy and her father Wink, living on the economic edge. What they came back with is homegrown magical realism and two astonishing performances – along with the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance and the Cannes Film Festival prize for Best First Film.
Sunday, there’s also a matinee feature, National Theatre Live presents The Last Of The Haussmans, a three-generational drama set in a crumbling Art Deco cottage on England’s Devon coast. The matriarch, in a show-stopping turn by Julie Walters, has summoned her children and grandchildren as she recovers from cancer. No tea and scone-serving Granny, she is an alternately hilarious and selfish survivor of the 1960s, whose radical journey has brought an angry next generation home to roost. Tickets and information at www.cinestudio.org

___________________________________________________________
And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s
 Wild Wild Live with MC Apper

A sneak peek into the magical live music scene of Wes. Tune in for in-station sets from campus bands and recordings of up-and-coming artists’ campus shows.

From 6:00 to 6:30pm 
it’s Free Speech Radio News – Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.

For the next half hour, until 7pm you have the Middletown Youth Radio Project – A weekly radio program featuring the thoughts, voices, creativity and talent of the kids in the WESU neighborhood.

At 7, until 8:30pm we have the Universal Sound Wave with Sistah Tee – Informing listeners about local and global issues with health, nutrition, and stress reduction tips, featuring a wide range of music including African, reggae, gospel, R&B, Latin, and blues.

Next up until 10pm, we take it
 From the Otherside with 
Rok-A-Dee – The Voice of Hartford, including local artists from Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He also features upcoming artists performing Caribbean R & B, Soca and international music.

From 10 until Midnight, take in
 the sounds of Rumba en el Patio 
with Michael
- Classic Salsa for the dancers, Afro-Latin Big Band for the discerning ear. Join us as we adventure through the history of Musica Latina!

At Midnight until 1:30am Saturday it’s 
N.E. Tempo with 
DJ Berk
- Serious turntablism – Dubstep, DnB, techno, ragga jungle, breakbeats mixed live.

At 1:30am we go 
In the Master Bedroom, Under the Bed with 
Dope Dave 
until 3am – Celebrating conscious hip-hop and its offshoots & influences. Acrobatic emcees and down-tempo poets mix it up over varied oceans of sound.

At 3, to 4am it’s the Bassment Beats – the Real Hip-Hop is over here.

Then, we bring you
 Sing Out! 
from 4 to 5am, on a mission to preserve and support the cultural diversity and heritage of all traditional and contemporary folk musics, and to encourage making folk music a part of our everyday lives.

And we bring in the daylight from 5:00 to 6:00am with the 
BBC World News 
- a daily News roundup from the British Broadcasting Corporation

And staying on the other side of the big pond, from 6:00 to 7:00am it’s
 the Celtic Café
 with Pat Laffan and Mark Gallagher presenting traditional and contemporary music with a Celtic connection.

And now that the coffee’s hot enjoy Caffé Italiafrom 7:00 to 8:00am 
with Francesco Fiumara, the former host of WESU’s own WESParla 
 – A weekly roundup of news, music and memories from Italy.

That’s all for today’s Jive At Five, tune in each and every weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.

The Music behind today’s Jive At Five is from Kevin Norton’s Metaphor Quartet, a CD entitled Not Only In That Golden Tree . . . featuring (the late) Wilber Morris, Masahiko Kono, Hitomi Tono’Oka and Kevin Norton, the selection “not drunk, but stunned” and it’s out on clean feed records.

The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at wesufm.org/jive 

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening!

Thursday’s Jive

Today’s Jive was recorded and produced by: 

J-Cherry… producer and host of, ‘VOICE of the CITY’
 Airing on WESU 88.1 FM Middletown
Tuesdays from 8-9PM
Live and local… This ain’t no commercial radio!
jcherrypresents.com


Good evening, it’s Thursday, October 11th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m J-Cherry producer and host of VOICE of the CITY now airing in our new timeslot,  Tuesday from 8-9PM, Showcasing live and local music, arts, and culture.Thanks for tuning in. Thanks for tuning in!!

Tonight, at the Buttonwood Tree, and the second Thursday of every month – brings Writers Out Loud!, an open mic night and critique of literary prose; participants can sign up at 6:45.

Friday evening, Karaoke with Deni comes to the Buttonwood, and Saturday, from 1 to 4 p.m., it’s a free afternoon of readings by International Poets – their only Connecticut stop on a whirlwind tour, with live music, an open mic, and a lavish reception with Indian foods.

Saturday night, from 8 to 10 p.m., catch “Explorations in Sound,” with Rich McGhee and Margaux Modimo at The Buttonwood Tree. Tickets are $10.On Sunday, “Food Not Bombs” shares food in front of the Buttonwood beginning about 1 p.m. All are welcome! Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on its website at buttonwood.org.

Tonight at Wesleyan, WESU will host Ilya Marritz, Wesleyan class of ’99, as the station’s lecture series continues. Marritz is a business reporter for WNYC and has worked as a producer for the Brian Lehrer Show and NPR’s All Things Considered. He has contributed stories to NPR’s Morning Edition and reported with radio stations in Berlin and Prague about everything from employment and economic development to energy and the environment. His talk on Thursday at CFA Hall about his experience working in public radio will be from 8 to 9:30 p.m.

On Saturday at the Russell Library, the Russell Knitters meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Look for more info at www.russelllibrary.org

Over at the Wesleyan Potters gallery shop, through Nov. 2, you can catch “Fibers,” a show of baskets and weavings in the Gallery Shop. www.wesleyanpotters.com With the arrival of fall, farmers’ markets have given way to country fairs, including this one: the Portland Fair on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, on the Exchange Club Grounds, Rte 17A in Portland. Go to www.portlandfair.com for details.

For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org.

Tonight, down at Toad’s Place in New Haven, it’s WAKA FLOCKA FLAME, along with Reema Major and Wooh Da Kid.Then Friday, it’s EOTO and Jansten. Sunday evening you can catch Rebelution, Passafire and Through the Roots. More information and details can be found at toadsplace.com.

Over at Café Nine in New Haven, tonight, it’s Black Top Forest. And on Friday, the happy hour features Billy Calash & Friends, followed by Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys.Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted Gary Grippo and Friends, followed by the Manic Productions presentation of the David Liebe Hart Band of Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show and Adult Swim.Sunday afternoon brings Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School to Café Nine: What do you get when you combine art school and alcohol? A great time and some creative drawings. Come down and enjoy a fun three hours of life drawing.That’s followed at 8 by the Sunday-After-Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars. More info can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s on Friday, the Eric Gales Band band takes the Sally’s stage. He plays his blues guitar upside-down and left-handed in the style passed down by his grandfather Dempsey Garrett, Sr, who was known to jam with Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. And on Saturday at 9, it’s the Bluegrass Hoedown with three bands for the price of one: Too Blue; Cornfed Dogs; and Chasing Blue. More can be found online at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten path in central CT:

At Real Art Ways, tonight Improvisations, featuring Marco Eneidi on alto sax, Joe Morris on guitar and Stephen Haynes on cornet. Improvisations is an artist-curated performance series centering on improvised music.
Also on tonight, the screening of Presidential campaign-season debates continues with the vice-presidential candidates battling it out on Real Art Ways big screen. The cafe opens at 5 PM, and the debate starts at 9 PM. Get your absolute political fill in addition to drink specials, debate BINGO and free WIFI for all of your tweeting, blogging or Facebooking needs.The debates will lead up to a special election night event featuring a live, in-house broadcast by WNPR’s Colin McEnroe and John Dankosky.Friday begins seven days of the documentary film “Bill W.,” the story of the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous. Saturday’s screening of “Bill W.” is followed by a one-time showing of “Breaking the Maya Code.” The complex and beautiful Maya hieroglyphic script was until recently the world’s last major undeciphered writing system. Its decoding has unlocked the secrets of one of mankind’s greatest civilizations. That’s followed by “The Room.” Called “the best terrible movie ever,” it’s booked for monthly late shows at Real Art Ways.Then Sunday begins the series, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey.”
Prodigious, poetic, and unlike any other “history” of cinema, Mark Cousins’s The Story of Film: An Odyssey is, as the title promises, a thrilling journey. Cousins’s personal voyage—complete with side-trips and retraced steps—is an illuminating, idiosyncratic tour of the emotional and intellectual pleasures of cinema.
Offered in 15 weekly chapters, with a combined running time of 15 hours, the film is a treasure trove of clips from films both famous and underappreciated, interviews from a global who’s-who of filmmakers, and passionate, provocative commentary.Sunday’s chapter covers the “Birth of the Cinema” (from 1900–1920); and “The Hollywood Dream” (the 1920s.) More can be found at www.realartways.com.

Tonight at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s theater, brings a free, one-time showing of “The Cup,”  a fascinating and amusing look at the Western influences reaching into a Tibetan Buddhist monastery. High in the Himalayas, the young monks (who play themselves in the film) have devoted their lives to an ancient religious tradition and rigorous spiritual discipline. They are also high-spirited teenagers obsessed with soccer. Friday begins screenings of “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Armed with a 16mm camera and a limited budget, a New Orleans collective of filmmakers took off for a Louisiana bayou to make a movie (with non-professional actors) about a 6-year-old girl named Hushpuppy and her father Wink, living on the economic edge. What they came back with is homegrown magic realism and two astonishing performances – along with the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance and the Cannes Film Festival prize for Best First Film.

Sunday, there’s also a matinee feature, National Theatre Live presents THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS, a three-generational drama set in a crumbling Art Deco cottage on England’s Devon coast. The matriarch, in a show-stopping turn by Julie Walters, has summoned her children and grandchildren as she recovers from cancer. No tea and scone-serving Granny, she is an alternately hilarious and selfish survivor of the 1960s, whose radical journey has brought an angry next generation home to roost.
Tickets and information at www.cinestudio.org


And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU’s new fall schedule. right after the Jive it’s:




Homegrown with Rob DeRosa
The best crop of Connecticut-connected music presented for a global audience.


Free Speech Radio News From The Pacifica Network
Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.


Total Praise with Minister Latrecia
A diverse and inspirational blend of contemporary gospel music to uplift your spirit!


Evening Jazz with Bill Denert
Where hearing is the best experience. A broad range of swing, be-bop, and avant garde as well as a sprinkling of new releases.


Bridging the Gap with Jesse Brent
Exploring how music has changed forms through the years, and the links that tie together seemingly disparate genres such as blues and rap, or funk and Krautrock.


Alphabet Soup with DJ Blaze
An anti-genre, request-based melting pot. Each episode, we randomly select a letter from the alphabet, and play bands or artists whose names start with that letter. A wild romp through the annals of WESU’s music library, supported and guided by the interests of our listeners.


Bach Party with Canyon Girl
Bach Party will feature a unique theme each week showcasing work from a grand pool of classical composers and compositions. Tune in, remain composed, and keep it classy.


Hip-Hop Kitchen with Alex G
We play positivistic, afrocentric and jazz influenced hip-hop/rap that’s mixed with food news, recipes, reviews, tips, tricks, fun facts. Basically good food to eat while you listen to good hip-hop.


Songs Without Words with Jacob Feder
Songs Without Words offers an eclectic assortment of instrumental musics both new and old.


UnderCover with Rebecca Seidel
The best covers take original tracks and transform them into their own creations. Bridging genres, musical styles, and time, Undercover explores the concept of inspiration through imitation. Sometimes they surpass the original, sometimes they miss the mark – it’s your call.


Jack’s Jazz and Jam with DJ Jack
I will be playing music that features that blends styles, genres, and interesting melodic and harmonic arrangements. I would focus specifically on jazz and jazz influenced music, rock n’ roll, jam bands, bluegrass, funk, and any blending of the above genres.


Rock Fatale with DJ Stella
Featuring the first ladies of rock, from The Marvelettes to Metric.


Sunspot Loops
A sporadic exploration of what exists in music at the moment.


Corporate Radio Talk Show Live Superstar 9000 with \.com
The talk show that has the FCC raving! We never cease to disappoint.


The BBC World News Service kicks on at 4AM and we begin tomorrow’s broadcast at 5 a.m. with Morning Edition from NPR.


That’s all for today’s Jive at Five, if you didn’t get a chance to write down some of the information mentioned in our community calendar, the script is published online at www.wesufm.org/jive, and if you know of any events that you’d like to have announced on the Jive, send them tojive@wesufm.org If you tune in to WESU for information and music that you can’t find elsewhere, then we are counting on you to help support the service you depend on.

Please take a moment to make a donation of any size online at www.wesufm.org, every dollar counts and we need to hear from you.Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Homegrown with Rob DeRosa

Music Director Picks of the Week

Each week, the music directors of WESU, Jesse Brent and Adam Isaacson will be picking out our favorite new releases from the big pile we sort through at the station. Here is our first installment:

Tame Impala- Lonerism
 

We were both big fans of Tame Impala’s debut Innerspeaker, so seeing this waiting for us in the board room was definitely exciting. This, their second album, is far from a sophomore slump. The boys from Perth keep it coming with satisfying, hard-hitting psychedelic rock with plenty of sweet guitar solos. It’ll take some time to tell if this one tops the debut, but it’s a keeper for sure. Recommended track: #3 (Apocalypse Dreams)

Tim Maia- World Psychedelic Classics 4: Nobody Can Live Forever: The Existential Soul of Tim Maia

 

In the midst of a mescaline trip, Tim Maia discovered the manifesto for the obscure cult, Cultura Racional. He became an adherent of the cult, making two albums largely written about his devotion to it. That hardly matters when listening to those albums (Racional Vols. 1 & 2), several tracks of which are featured here. What does is that the music is some of the funkiest, best soul music I’ve ever had the pleasure of grooving out to. Knowing the backstory just makes it that much more weirdly awesome. Recommended tracks: #s 4, 5 & 8 (Ela Partiu, Quer Queira, Quer Não Queira, Nobody Can Live Forever)

Alvarius B- Alvarius B

One of the perks of being a music director is getting record labels to send us free stuff. In this case, we emailed Forced Exposure and they sent us a big package of CDs and vinyl, which was very cool of them. Thanks Forced Exposure! My favorite discovery from this collection was this reissue of a double album (first released in 1998 but recorded in the 80s) by this Sun City Girls member. Forced Exposure describes the album as “Perhaps the most deranged collection of original folk songs ever cut to wax. Dark, twisted & apocalyptic.” It reminded me at first of some parts of Captain Beefheart’s experimental classic Trout Mask Replica. As song titles like “Cooking with Satan” and “Seeing-Eye Latte” suggest, he’s got a good sense of humor too. This is definitely for fans of out-there stuff, and it won’t all be easy listening, but it’s got its rewards to it– great, and often hilarious songwriting. Recommended track: #4 (Seeing-Eye Latte)

Music Director Picks of the Week

Each week, the music directors of WESU, Jesse Brent and Adam Isaacson will be picking out our favorite new releases from the big pile we sort through at the station. Here is our first installment:

Tame Impala- Lonerism
 

We were both big fans of Tame Impala’s debut Innerspeaker, so seeing this waiting for us in the board room was definitely exciting. This, their second album, is far from a sophomore slump. The boys from Perth keep it coming with satisfying, hard-hitting psychedelic rock with plenty of sweet guitar solos. It’ll take some time to tell if this one tops the debut, but it’s a keeper for sure. Recommended track: #3 (Apocalypse Dreams)

Tim Maia- World Psychedelic Classics 4: Nobody Can Live Forever: The Existential Soul of Tim Maia

 

In the midst of a mescaline trip, Tim Maia discovered the manifesto for the obscure cult, Cultura Racional. He became an adherent of the cult, making two albums largely written about his devotion to it. That hardly matters when listening to those albums (Racional Vols. 1 & 2), several tracks of which are featured here. What does is that the music is some of the funkiest, best soul music I’ve ever had the pleasure of grooving out to. Knowing the backstory just makes it that much more weirdly awesome. Recommended tracks: #s 4, 5 & 8 (Ela Partiu, Quer Queira, Quer Não Queira, Nobody Can Live Forever)

Alvarius B- Alvarius B

One of the perks of being a music director is getting record labels to send us free stuff. In this case, we emailed Forced Exposure and they sent us a big package of CDs and vinyl, which was very cool of them. Thanks Forced Exposure! My favorite discovery from this collection was this reissue of a double album (first released in 1998 but recorded in the 80s) by this Sun City Girls member. Forced Exposure describes the album as “Perhaps the most deranged collection of original folk songs ever cut to wax. Dark, twisted & apocalyptic.” It reminded me at first of some parts of Captain Beefheart’s experimental classic Trout Mask Replica. As song titles like “Cooking with Satan” and “Seeing-Eye Latte” suggest, he’s got a good sense of humor too. This is definitely for fans of out-there stuff, and it won’t all be easy listening, but it’s got its rewards to it– great, and often hilarious songwriting. Recommended track: #4 (Seeing-Eye Latte)

10-10-12 jive


Good evening, it’s Wednesday, October 10th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Bill Denert, producer and host of Thursday night’s Evening Jazz where “hearing is the best experience” and Connecticut’s number 1 Washington Nationals fan! Thanx for tuning in!!

Tonight, at the Buttonwood Tree, it’s the “Evening Oasis” belly dancing presentation.
Thursday – and the second Thursday of every month – brings Writers Out Loud!, an open mic night and critique of literary prose; participants can sign up at 6:45.

Friday evening, Karaoke with Deni comes to the Buttonwood, and Saturday, from 1 to 4 p.m., it’s a free afternoon of readings by International Poets – their only Connecticut stop on a whirlwind tour, with live music, an open mic, and a lavish reception with Indian foods.

Saturday night, from 8 to 10 p.m., catch “Explorations in Sound,” with Rich McGhee and Margaux Modimo at The Buttonwood Tree. Tickets are $10.
On Sunday, “Food Not Bombs” shares food in front of the Buttonwood beginning about 1 p.m. All are welcome! Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on its website at buttonwood.org.

Wednesday evening, at 8 p.m., poet and biographer Lisa Jarnot reads at the university’s Russell House. Jarnot’s acclaimed biography of the San Francisco poet Robert Duncan was published this year, and her Selected Poems is forthcoming next year. She teaches poetry and works as a freelance gardener in Queens, New York.

On Thursday at Wesleyan, WESU will host Ilya Marritz, Wesleyan class of ’99, as the station’s lecture series continues. Marritz is a business reporter for WNYC and has worked as a producer for the Brian Lehrer Show and NPR’s All Things Considered. He has contributed stories to NPR’s Morning Edition and reported with radio stations in Berlin and Prague about everything from employment and economic development to energy and the environment. His talk on Thursday at CFA Hall about his experience working in public radio will be from 8 to 9:30 p.m.

This evening at Russell library, everyone who cares about Middletown and the Russell Library is invited to “Bringing Together People and Ideas for the Future.” Attend one of the Library’s Public Forums on either this evening at 6:00 p.m., or on Saturday morning, November 10, at 9:00 a.m.

The forums will be led by Alan Gray, a planning consultant with extensive experience in libraries, the business world, and in education.

On Saturday at the Russell Library, the Russell Knitters meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Look for more info at www.russelllibrary.org

Over at the Wesleyan Potters gallery shop, through Nov. 2, you can catch “Fibers,” a show of baskets and weavings in the Gallery Shop. www.wesleyanpotters.com
With the arrival of fall, farmers’ markets have given way to country fairs, including this one: the Portland Fair on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, on the Exchange Club Grounds, Rte 17A in Portland. Go to www.portlandfair.com for details.

For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org.

Tonight, down at Toad’s Place in New Haven, you can catch The White Panda on the Toad’s stage, as well as 2 A.M. Club and Kinetics and One Love, as well as the usual EDM Night.

Thursday, it’s WAKA FLOCKA FLAME, along with Reema Major and Wooh Da Kid.
Then Friday, it’s EOTO and Jansten. Sunday evening you can catch Rebelution, Passafire and Through the Roots. More information and details can be found at toadsplace.com.

Over at Café Nine in New Haven, tonight, TACO HUT MUSIC Presents: Fake Babies; Netherfriends; Mission Zero; and Ports of Spain and on Thursday, it’s Black Top Forest.

And on Friday, the happy hour features Billy Calash & Friends, followed by Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys.

Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted Gary Grippo and Friends, followed by the Manic Productions presentation of the David Liebe Hart Band of Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show and Adult Swim.

Sunday afternoon brings Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School to Café Nine: What do you get when you combine art school and alcohol? A great time and some creative drawings. Come down and enjoy a fun three hours of life drawing.

That’s followed at 8 by the Sunday-After-Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars. More info can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s, tonight at 8, it’s the weekly Blues Jam with Ray Morant. Sally’s hosts one of the longest running open blues jams in New England, featuring a different host each week.

Friday, the Eric Gales Band band takes the Sally’s stage. He plays his blues guitar upside-down and left-handed in the style passed down by his grandfather Dempsey Garrett, Sr, who was known to jam with Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf.

And on Saturday at 9, it’s the Bluegrass Hoedown with three bands for the price of one: Too Blue; Cornfed Dogs; and Chasing Blue. More can be found online at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten path in central CT:

At Real Art Ways tonight, it’s “Inescapable Rhythms”;  a second-Wednesday-of-the-month poetry reading and open mic series that takes its title from the Wallace Stevens poem, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.” Stevens was a major American Modernist poet and a badass Hartford resident.

Thursday, Real Art Ways features Improvisations, featuring Marco Eneidi on alto sax, Joe Morris on guitar and Stephen Haynes on cornet. Improvisations is an artist-curated performance series centering on improvised music.

Also on Thursday, the screening of Presidential campaign-season debates continues with the vice-presidential candidates battling it out on Real Art Ways big screen. The cafe opens at 5 PM, and the debate starts at 9 PM. Get your absolute political fill in addition to drink specials, debate BINGO and free WIFI for all of your tweeting, blogging or Facebooking needs.

The debates will lead up to a special election night event featuring a live, in-house broadcast by WNPR’s Colin McEnroe and John Dankosky.

Friday begins seven days of the documentary film “Bill W.,” the story of the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Saturday’s screening of “Bill W.” is followed by a one-time showing of “Breaking the Maya Code.” The complex and beautiful Maya hieroglyphic script was until recently the world’s last major undeciphered writing system. Its decoding has unlocked the secrets of one of mankind’s greatest civilizations.

That’s followed by “The Room.” Called “the best terrible movie ever,” it’s booked for monthly late shows at Real Art Ways.

Then Sunday begins the series, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey.”
Prodigious, poetic, and unlike any other “history” of cinema, Mark Cousins’s The Story of Film: An Odyssey is, as the title promises, a thrilling journey. Cousins’s personal voyage—complete with side-trips and retraced steps—is an illuminating, idiosyncratic tour of the emotional and intellectual pleasures of cinema.
Offered in 15 weekly chapters, with a combined running time of 15 hours, the film is a treasure trove of clips from films both famous and underappreciated, interviews from a global who’s-who of filmmakers, and passionate, provocative commentary.
Sunday’s chapter covers the “Birth of the Cinema” (from 1900–1920); and “The Hollywood Dream” (the 1920s.) More can be found at www.realartways.com.

Over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s theater, “Ruby Sparks” continues through this evening.

Then Thursday brings a free, one-time showing of “The Cup,”  a fascinating and amusing look at the Western influences reaching into a Tibetan Buddhist monastery. High in the Himalayas, the young monks (who play themselves in the film) have devoted their lives to an ancient religious tradition and rigorous spiritual discipline. They are also high-spirited teenagers obsessed with soccer.

Friday begins screenings of “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Armed with a 16mm camera and a limited budget, a New Orleans collective of filmmakers took off for a Louisiana bayou to make a movie (with non-professional actors) about a 6-year-old girl named Hushpuppy and her father Wink, living on the economic edge. What they came back with is homegrown magic realism and two astonishing performances – along with the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance and the Cannes Film Festival prize for Best First Film.

Sunday, there’s also a matinee feature, National Theatre Live presents THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS, a three-generational drama set in a crumbling Art Deco cottage on England’s Devon coast. The matriarch, in a show-stopping turn by Julie Walters, has summoned her children and grandchildren as she recovers from cancer. No tea and scone-serving Granny, she is an alternately hilarious and selfish survivor of the 1960s, whose radical journey has brought an angry next generation home to roost.
Tickets and information at www.cinestudio.org

And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive at 5, it’s the Needle Drop with Anthony Fantano. An hour of the latest and greatest in the world of independent rock, pop, electronica, and experimental music out there today.

From 6-6:30 it’s
Free Speech Radio News. Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.

Starting at 6:30 and running until 8pm it’s Fusion Radio with James Fusion. Techno from around the globe mixed live since 1992. It’s a vinyl world!

From 8-9:30pm it’s The Warehouse with Mike Nyce. The best of underground house music, mixed live for your listening pleasure.

Beginning at 9:30 until11pm it’s Missteps with Guy Fridge and Nicholas Msall

Missteps is a club night, record label, and radio show run by Guy Fridge and Nicholas Msall that seeks to bring attention to the latest in underground club music from around the world. Missteps focuses on forward-thinking dance music including juke, global bass music, uk-garage, underground house/techno, and wonky beats.

Then from 11pm-midnight, it’s Shelf Life with DJ Quandry

Shelf Life is an electronic music show consisting of random cds plucked from the shelves of the electronic music section minutes before the start of the show. It’s a guaranteed way to discover new, different, and surprising artists in the electronic genre.

From midnight to 1:30am, DJ Gus Lo presents Midnight Munchies! Below Ground Street music your ears have been craving for!

From 1:30-2:30am it’s Pop! Goes My Heart with Ian McCarthy

From 2:30-3:30am it’s Alive Not Amplified with Adrien
The longest running student radio show on WESU! Electronics discouraged.

And starting at  3:30 until 4am it’s DJ Vegetable Reads Missed Connections
You’ve lost someone. Let’s find them.

The BBC World News Service kicks on at 4AM and we begin tomorrow’s broadcast at 5 a.m. with Morning Edition from NPR.

That’s all for today’s Jive at Five, if you didn’t get a chance to write down some of the information mentioned in our community calendar, the script is published online at wesufm.org/jive, and if you know of any events that you’d like to have announced on the Jive, send them to jive@wesufm.org

If you tune in to WESU for information and music that you can’t find elsewhere, then we are counting on you to help support the service you depend on.

Please take a moment to make a donation of any size online at wesufm.org. Every dollar counts and we need to hear from you.

Thanx for tuning in and stay tuned for The Needle Drop.

10-09-12 Board Notes

10-10-12

 

WESU board of Directors Agenda

 

program guides – let’s get (Tri)folding!

 

-TM-didn’t find coverage first show, sent out an email, no one covered it, so person after him turned up automation and he entered automation into spinitron (did he actually do this?)-further disciplinary action? Service hour?

-didn’t know standard procedure about turning up automation, emailed the DJ before him and the DJ said he would turn up automation

-knew he was supposed to find coverage and he didn’t (he thought that automation was coverage-as long as there was something playing on air, that would suffice-Rick encourages TM not to have a defeatist attitude in life)

-Ben asserts that the reason that TM was suspended was because the board had to investigate why TM wasn’t at his show

-board encourages TM to pre-record his show

-Scarlet Letter punishment?

-punishment? Want him to look at the training guide.

                        -MOTION: no longer suspended, one of his service hours is to pre-record a canned show: PASSED (everyone yells……..)

 

-NB: fell victim to 1, 3, 5 syndrome

-he was at the staff meeting

-punishment? Contact Ben! He will make a calendar highlighting 1, 3, 5. PASSED

 

-Record Fair Promos:

-I and M made them

-Mickey will talk to Malcolm Tent

 

-Homelessness Marathon

-A and D contact people in charge

-Virgil: Press release to Argus Middletown Press Courant, Mtown Eye and Patch

-Isabelle: Promo

-Training:

-Adam talked for about 15 minutes (about 20 showed up)

-He updated the website (updated wesufm.org/training)

-everyone sign up to take interns on your shows!

-let trainees take written exam at any point if they’re prepared but keep official testing day in place (Ben will be a “freelance tester”)

-paper form for service hours/internships vs. online spreadsheet of service hours (form sent to special address, part of board hours to review and enter info into spreadsheet)

 

-Isabelle leaves

-Check email if you can during board hours!

 

-Avery send email to Ben to get forwarding of emails set up

 

-On website: “If you have information you want to get across, here’s who you contact (about PSAs, Events, submit new music) DAN (and Virgil)

 

-Facebook update!

-is there anyone on the board who’s interested in created content for the Facebook (MDs?)-Virgil can set you up (Adam can have google calendar link to Facebook)

-MD email roundup is kind of long to put on the Facebook

-“to see our picks of the week, click here”

 

-Ilya

-who’s picking him up? We don’t know because we don’t know what time he’s coming

-Ben suggests using portable Marantz setup with Mic at Podium (if possible)?

-all board members: take flyers and hang ‘em up!

-Wesleying-Virgil will write the content  for the “Full Fall Lineup” (send it to Adam I. by 7), Adam I. will post it tomorrow (WED) at 8 pm!!!!!!

-JKK will email about lecture series (and record fair)

 

-Code of Conduct Review

-Avery will send out an email, board members plus BS will track changes

 

-Archiving and Recording shows – Ben has been in touch with company – Sorting out payment and basic tech stuff before handing over to Dan Nass. (MARY EMAIL SBC!!!!)

 

-Who still needs email forwarding and keys? Let Ben know!

 

-Lynn Levy

-going with Bricca

 

-Doug B confirmed (November 1st)-AVERY SINGS IT!

 

-MTVU shoot (November 3rd???)

 

-CMJ-Rick says go to “a place” to get badges (Tues 16th-Sat 20th)

 

-Need to recruit rec fair DJs

-Mickey get volunteers together! Send out another email to the staff.

 

-Playlists / new releases -Are MDs monitoring and keeping tabs on this? Still some non Spinitron users…….

-MDs need to figure out who’s not doing Spinitron

-monitoring new releases, looking through playlists (delegating this/asking for help)

-Confusion-if you’re not playing recorded music, do it to the best of your ability

-Spinitron stuff will soon be in the Code of Conduct

-If you can’t do it yourself, find someone to help you

-MD can send helpful email to specific people (have people who don’t do Spinitron now can stick around after November meeting)

 

-Spinitron for Automated shows…   Someone’s gotta make sure this is happening. The Needle Drop, Celtic Café, Max Rock and Roll Radio, and more.

-We can offer svc hrs for automated show spinitron input

 

-WESU Design deadlines…. What type of gear do we want? Long Sleeves and Totes?

-Virgil will contact people!

-Deadline: by the end of October (AG)

 

“Getting to the point in the meeting where we just giggle” -Adrien

-Fall Break students need to be alerted they are responsible for finding coverage.

-Music in Public Life Evan’s spots – Should we ask him to find shows that want to air them? Yes. Have him send an email to the staff (each episode) Mickey will email him about one of the upcoming weeks

 

MEETING adjourned

 

Good afternoon, it’s Tuesday, October 9th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Isabelle Gauthier, host of the Fuss, an interview show with people from the Middletown area airing the 1st 3rd and 5th Fridays of the month from 1:00-1:30
Here’s what’s happening in our area:
Tomorrow, at the Buttonwood Tree, it’s the “Evening Oasis” belly dancing presentation.
Thursday – and the second Thursday of every month – brings Writers Out Loud!, an open mic night and critique of literary prose; sign up at 6:45.
Friday evening, Karaoke with Deni comes to the Buttonwood.
And Saturday, from 1 to 4 p.m., it’s a free afternoon of readings by International Poets – their only Connecticut stop on a whirlwind tour, with live music, an open mic, and a lavish reception with Indian foods.
Saturday night, from 8 to 10 p.m., catch “Explorations in Sound,” with Rich McGhee and Margaux Modimo at The Buttonwood Tree. Tickets are $10.
On Sunday, “Food Not Bombs” shares food in front of the Buttonwood beginning about 1 p.m.
Information about all Buttonwood events can be found on its website at www.buttonwood.org.
The Wesleyan Center for the Arts’ Music & Public Life series continues at 4:15 tomorrow with Rachel Mundy, class of 2000’s “Birds, Bytes, and the Natural History of Music.” Now a University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor of Music, Rachel will examine the public discourse around the complexities of birdsong. To be held in the Daltry Room on campus at 50 Wyllys Avenue.
For more information, visit Wesleyan.edu’s Music & Public Life site.
Also at Wesleyan on Wednesday, at 8 p.m., poet and biographer Lisa Jarnot reads at the university’s Russell House. Jarnot’s acclaimed biography of the San Francisco poet Robert Duncan was published this year, and her Selected Poems is forthcoming next year. She teaches poetry and works as a freelance gardener in Queens, New York.
On Thursday at Wesleyan, your favorite radio station, WESU, will host Ilya Marritz, Wesleyan class of ’99, as the station’s lecture series continues. Marritz is a business reporter for WNYC and has worked as a producer for the Brian Lehrer Show and NPR’s All Things Considered. He has contributed stories to NPR’s Morning Edition and reported with radio stations in Berlin and Prague about everything from employment and economic development to energy and the environment. His talk on Thursday at CFA Hall about his experience working in public radio will be from 8 to 9:30 p.m.
Tomorrow at Russell library, everyone who cares about Middletown and the Russell Library is invited to “Bringing Together People and Ideas for the Future.” Attend one of the Library’s Public Forums on either Wednesday evening at 6:00 p.m., or on Saturday morning, November 10, at 9:00 a.m.
The forums will be led by Alan Gray, a planning consultant with extensive experience in libraries, the business world, and in education.
On Saturday at the Russell Library, the Russell Knitters meet from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Look for more info at www.russelllibrary.org
Over at the Wesleyan Potters gallery shop, through Nov. 2, you can catch “Fibers,” a show of baskets and weavings in the Gallery Shop. www.wesleyanpotters.com
With the arrival of fall, farmers’ markets have given way to country fairs, including this one: the Portland Fair on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, on the Exchange Club Grounds, Rte 17A in Portland. Go to www.portlandfair.com for details.
For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org.
Tomorrwo night, down at Toad’s Place in New Haven, you can catch The White Panda to the Toad’s stage, as well as 2 A.M. Club and Kinetics and One Love, as well as the usual EDM Night.
Thursday, it’s WAKA FLOCKA FLAME, along with Reema Major and Wooh Da Kid.
Then Friday, it’s EOTO and Jansten.
Sunday, catch Rebelution, Passafire and Through the Roots.
Details at www.toadsplace.com.
Over at Café Nine in New Haven, tonight is the Todd Kramer, with Matt Sucich.
Wednesday , TACO HUT MUSIC Presents: Fake Babies; Netherfriends; Mission Zero; and Ports of Spain.
Thursday, it’s Black Top Forest.
And Friday, the happy hour features Billy Calash & Friends, followed by Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys.
Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted Gary Grippo and Friends, followed by the Manic Productions presentation of the David Liebe Hart Band of Tim and Eric’s Awesome Show and Adult Swim.
Sunday afternoon brings Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School to Café Nine: What do you get when you combine art school and alcohol? A great time and some creative drawings. Come down and enjoy a fun three hours of life drawing.
That’s followed at 8 by the Sunday-After-Supper Jam, with host Kevin Saint James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars.
More info at www.cafenine.com.
Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s, tomorrow night at 8, it’s the weekly Blues Jam with Ray Morant. Sally’s is one of the longest running open blues jams in New England, featuring a different host each week.
Friday, the Eric Gales Band band takes the Sally’s stage. He plays his blues guitar upside-down and left-handed in the style passed down by his grandfather Dempsey Garrett, Sr, who was known to jam with Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf.
Saturday at 9, it’s the Bluegrass Hoedown with three bands for the price of one: Too Blue; Cornfed Dogs; and Chasing Blue.
More at www.blackeyedsallys.com.
Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten paths of central CT:
At Real Art Ways tonight, “Beauty is Embarrassing” continues, followed by “Liberal Arts,” in which a newly single 35-year-old makes his way back to his college where he reunites with fond memories and old relationships.
Tonight  brings “Science on Screen: 28 Days Later,” with an intro by science writer and blogger Carl Zimmer, who  has an interest in evolution and parasites. The speculative sci-fi/horror film, by Trainspotting director Danny Boyle, is about animal rights activists who free a group of infected chimpanzees to horrifying results.
Wednesday brings“ Inescapable Rhythms,” a second-Wednesday-of-the-month poetry reading and open mic series that takes its title from the Wallace Stevens poem, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.” Stevens was a major American Modernist poet and a badass Hartford resident.
Thursday at Real Art Ways features Improvisations, featuring Marco Eneidi on alto sax, Joe Morris on guitar and Stephen Haynes on cornet. Improvisations is an artist-curated performance series centering on improvised music.
Also on Thursday, the screening of Presidential campaign-season debates continues with the vice-presidential candidates battling it out on Real Art Ways big screen. The cafe opens at 5 PM, and the debate starts at 9 PM. Get your absolute political fill in addition to drink specials, debate BINGO and free WIFI for all of your tweeting, blogging or Facebooking needs.
The debates will lead up to a special election night event featuring a live, in-house broadcast by WNPR’s Colin McEnroe and John Dankosky.
Friday begins seven days of the documentary film “Bill W.,” the story of the co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous.
Saturday’s screening of “Bill W.” is followed by a one-time showing of “Breaking the Maya Code.” The complex and beautiful Maya hieroglyphic script was until recently the world’s last major undeciphered writing system. Its decoding has unlocked the secrets of one of mankind’s greatest civilizations.
That’s followed by “The Room.” Called “the best terrible movie ever,” it’s booked for monthly late shows at Real Art Ways.
Then Sunday begins the series, “The Story of Film: An Odyssey.”
Prodigious, poetic, and unlike any other “history” of cinema, Mark Cousins’s The Story of Film: An Odyssey is, as the title promises, a thrilling journey. Cousins’s personal voyage—complete with side-trips and retraced steps—is an illuminating, idiosyncratic tour of the emotional and intellectual pleasures of cinema.
Offered in 15 weekly chapters, with a combined running time of 15 hours, the film is a treasure trove of clips from films both famous and underappreciated, interviews from a global who’s-who of filmmakers, and passionate, provocative commentary.
Sunday’s chapter covers the “Birth of the Cinema” (1900–1920); and “The Hollywood Dream” (the 1920s.)
More at www.realartways.com
Over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s theater, “Ruby Sparks” continues through Wednesday.
Then Thursday brings a free, one-time showing of “The Cup,”  a fascinating and amusing look at the Western influences reaching into a Tibetan Buddhist monastery. High in the Himalayas, the young monks (who play themselves in the film) have devoted their lives to an ancient religious tradition and rigorous spiritual discipline. They are also high-spirited teenagers obsessed with soccer.
Friday begins screenings of “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Armed with a 16mm camera and a limited budget, a New Orleans collective of filmmakers took off for a Louisiana bayou to make a movie (with non-professional actors) about a 6-year-old girl named Hushpuppy and her father Wink, living on the economic edge. What they came back with is homegrown magic realism and two astonishing performances – along with the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance and the Cannes Film Festival prize for Best First Film.
Sunday, there’s also a matinee feature, National Theatre Live presents THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS, a three-generational drama set in a crumbling Art Deco cottage on England’s Devon coast. The matriarch, in a show-stopping turn by Julie Walters, has summoned her children and grandchildren as she recovers from cancer. No tea and scone-serving Granny, she is an alternately hilarious and selfish survivor of the 1960s, whose radical journey has brought an angry next generation home to roost.
Tickets and information at www.cinestudio.org
And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.
Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s Finding Bliss:
words and music with DJ Lauren “Bliss” Agnelli, an interview, free-form talk show about people who are collowing their hearts and living authentically.

From 6-6:30 is Free Speech Radio news from the Pacifica Network, your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting.

From 6:30-8:00 is Acoustic Blender with Bill Revill, an eclectic selection of Americana, country with root influence.

From 8-9pm is The Voice of the CITY with J-Cherry, your source for live and local Connecticut arts and music at its best.

From 9-10:30 is Wonderland with DJ Cheshire Cat, he writes in, Ive got a song in my heart, a chemical imbalance in my head, and a musical library at my fingers. From krautrock to post-rock, grunge to garage, novelty to New Romantic, punk to prog, Wonderland has a place for it.

From 10:30-11:30 is Record Roulette with Avery, featuring random, risky vynl.

From 11:30pm-12:30 am is Hardly Strictly Bluegrass with DJ Sleepy Girl, the dulcet tones of bluegrass and folk–just not entirely.

Wednesday, 12:30-1:30am is The Boss with DJ Moe, all about Bruce Springsteen: revered, remembered, relived. Each week shines the focus on a different era of the Boss.

Wednesday, 1:30-2:30am is Six Degrees Of David Bowie with Monica Kornis, where by connecting various artists to David Bowie in six steps or less we will observe his ubiquitous influence on modern music, as well as explore his many collaborations and influences.

And that’s all for today’s Jive At Five. Tune in each weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.

The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at wesufm.org/jive

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening!

WESU Middletown presents: Ilya Marritz

Ilya Marritz (Wesleyan University ’99) is a business reporter for WNYC, and has worked as a producer of the Brian Lehrer Show, as well as of NPR’s All Things Considered, contributed stories to NPR’s Morning Edition, and reported with radio stations in Berlin and Prague. He has covered everything from employment and economic development to energy and the environment.

WESU Middletown presents: Ilya Marritz

Ilya Marritz (Wesleyan University ’99) is a business reporter for WNYC, and has worked as a producer of the Brian Lehrer Show, as well as of NPR’s All Things Considered, contributed stories to NPR’s Morning Edition, and reported with radio stations in Berlin and Prague. He has covered everything from employment and economic development to energy and the environment.