Friday’s Jive 11-30-12

Good evening, it’s Friday, November 30th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and run down of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Stephan Allison, host of River Valley Rhythms heard Thursdays at 4 pm here at WESU. Thanks for tuning in.

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For the latest in local arts and entertainment anytime you’re not hearing it on our Jive, go to arts2GO.org – the City’s website for what’s going on and what’s to do with a highlight on the arts in Middletown. That’s arts2GO.org

Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:

Tonight at The Buttonwood Tree in the forest city of Middletown, it’s the Hartt School of Music: Classical Guitar Showcase. The Guitar Department at The Hartt School University of Hartford is the oldest performance-based guitar program in the country. The concert will feature ensemble and solo guitar music including guitar quartets, flute and guitar, as well as solos. Saturday night, the Eric Mintel Jazz Quartet, which played last year at the White House, performs favorite jazz tunes and originals. Sunday, and every Sunday, at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood Tree, Food Not Bombs serves vegetarian food. You’re invited to help prepare the meal at 11:30 a.m. at the First Church on Court. Learn about all Buttonwood events at www.buttonwood.org.

Tonight, Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts brings Music from East Asia to Wesleyan’s World Music Hall, featuring Wesleyan’s East Asian Ensembles presenting a variety of musical styles and repertories from East Asian cultures. Also, at Crowell Concert Hall, there will be a West African dance concert, in which choreographer and Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka will be joined by students and guest artists for an invigorating performance showcasing the vibrancy of West African cultures through music and dance forms. Saturday evening, in the World Music Hall, it’s the Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble and Javanese dance performance, an orchestra of bronze gongs, xylophones, drums. There is a candlelight concert at 7p Saturday in the Memorial Chapel featuring the Wesleyan Singers’ performance of selections from Handel’s oratorio Israel in Egypt Sunday brings the Worlds of Dance performance to Crowell Concert Hall. For more information, go to www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.

Tonight through Saturday, the Oddfellows Junior Reporatory Company will present Huck Finn at the Oddfellow Playhouse on Washington Street.

Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town” at the Performing Arts Center @MHS, 200 LaRosa Lane tonight and Saturday at 7pm is being presented by the MHS Drama Club. Tickets may be purchased at the door.

Violinist Emil Altschuler and pianist Artem Belogurov will perform Danzas Españolas on Saturday at 2pm in the Hubbard Room at Russell Library, 123 Broad St.

The Greater Middletown Chorale will perform Britten’s A Ceremony of Carols with harp and Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on Christmas Carols for baritone soloist and cello Saturday at 7pm and Sunday at 2pm in Zion Lutheran Church in Portland. Call 860-316-4854.


Tonight, down in New Haven at Toad’s Place The Machine performs Pink Floyd. And Saturday it’s the Original Saturday Night Dance Party. More information about all Toad’s shows can be found at 
toadsplace.com.

At Café Nine in New Haven tonight happy hour brings Malcolm Marsden, followed by a Tribute to the Anthology of American Folk Music, to benefit the CT Food Bank. Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted by the Mike Coppola Trio. That will be followed by Oddball Events’ and Café Nine’s presentation of Andre Williams; w/ Barrence Whitfield & the Savages; and Bronson Rock. Sunday, Manic Productions Simone Felice; w/ Smoke Signals will be performing. More can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight it’s Eddie Shaw & the Wolf Gang. It was the original backup band for Howlin’ Wolf until his death in 1975. Saturday brings Bad Rooster to Sallys. More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten track in Central Connecticut:

At Real Art Ways in Hartford opening today is The Loneliest Planet, in which a momentary misstep threatens to undo everything a young engaged couple believes about each other and themselves. Also opening tonight is Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters. Crewdson’s riveting photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single large-scale image. The film is a profile of the acclaimed artist, featuring fellow artists commenting on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images. Sunday brings Improvisations, the artist-curated performance series, to Real Art Ways. Then on Sunday, the Story of Film: An Odyssey, concludes with Part 8: “Cinema Today and the Future” (2000s). This and more can be found at realartways.org.

Tonight over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s cinema, “The Intouchables”, a comedy in which a caretaker to a quadriplegic Parisian aristocrat tries to break through his patient’s wall of loneliness is having a run. Sunday begins a double-feature run: Searching for Sugarman and Neil Young’s Journeys. For music and movie fans: one ticket, two unforgettable documentaries! Searching for Sugarman is about two South African fans’ search for Sixto Rodriguez, a ‘70s superstar who disappeared after rumors of an onstage suicide. Neil Young Journeys is directed by Jonathan Demme who gets the rock legend to share tales about his childhood and career, punctuated by classic songs as well as new ones. Learn more about what’s happening at cinestudio.org.

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And now let’s take a look at tonight’s programming on WESU.

Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s
 Wild Wild Live with MC Apper

A sneak peek into the magical live music scene of Wes. Tune in for in-station sets from campus bands and recordings of up-and-coming artists’ campus shows.

From 6:00 to 6:30pm 
it’s Free Speech Radio News – Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.

For the next half hour, until 7pm you have the Middletown Youth Radio Project – A weekly radio program featuring the thoughts, voices, creativity and talent of the kids in the WESU neighborhood.

At 7, until 8:30pm we have the Universal Sound Wave with Sistah Tee - Informing listeners about local and global issues with health, nutrition, and stress reduction tips, featuring a wide range of music including African, reggae, gospel, R&B, Latin, and blues.

Next up until 10pm, we take it
 From the Otherside with 
Rok-A-Dee - The Voice of Hartford, including local artists from Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He also features upcoming artists performing Caribbean R & B, Soca and international music.

From 10 until Midnight, take in
 the sounds of Rumba en el Patio 
with Michael
- Classic Salsa for the dancers, Afro-Latin Big Band for the discerning ear. Join us as we adventure through the history of Musica Latina!

At Midnight until 1:30am Saturday it’s 
N.E. Tempo with 
DJ Berk
- Serious turntablism – Dubstep, DnB, techno, ragga jungle, breakbeats mixed live.

At 1:30am we go 
In the Master Bedroom, Under the Bed with 
Dope Dave 
until 3am – Celebrating conscious hip-hop and its offshoots & influences. Acrobatic emcees and down-tempo poets mix it up over varied oceans of sound.

At 3, to 4am it’s the Bassment Beats – the Real Hip-Hop is over here.

Then, we bring you
 Sing Out! 
from 4 to 5am, on a mission to preserve and support the cultural diversity and heritage of all traditional and contemporary folk musics, and to encourage making folk music a part of our everyday lives.

And we bring in the daylight from 5:00 to 6:00am with the 
BBC World News 
- a daily News roundup from the British Broadcasting Corporation

And staying on the other side of the big pond, from 6:00 to 7:00am it’s
 the Celtic Café
 with Pat Laffan and Mark Gallagher presenting traditional and contemporary music with a Celtic connection.

And now that the coffee’s hot enjoy Caffé Italiafrom 7:00 to 8:00am 
with Francesco Fiumara, the former host of WESU’s own WESParla 
 – A weekly roundup of news, music and memories from Italy.

That’s all for today’s Jive At Five, tune in each and every weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.

The Music behind today’s Jive At Five is from Kevin Norton’s Metaphor Quartet, a CD entitled Not Only In That Golden Tree . . . featuring (the late) Wilber Morris, Masahiko Kono, Hitomi Tono’Oka and Kevin Norton, the selection “not drunk, but stunned” and it’s out on clean feed records.

The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at wesufm.org/jive 

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Thanks for listening!

Thursday’s Jive

Today’s Jive was recorded and produced by: 
J-Cherry… producer and host of, ‘VOICE of the CITY’
 Airing on WESU 88.1 FM Middletown
Tuesdays from 8-9PM
Live and local… This ain’t no commercial radio!
jcherrypresents.com


Good evening, it’s Thursday, Nov. 29th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m J-Cherry producer and host of VOICE of the CITY,  Tuesday from 8-9PM, Showcasing live and local music, arts, and culture.Thanks for tuning in. Here’s a 

Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:

Tonight at the Buttonwood Tree, The Music of Miles and Coltrane with the Noah Baerman Trio, featuring tenor saxophonist Jimmy Greene. The program is presented in conjunction with pianist and educator Noah Baerman’s course on Miles and Coltrain through Wesleyan University’s Graduate Liberal Studies program, and there will be a demonstration and Q&A session preceding the concert. Joining him and Jimmy Greene will be bassist Henry Lugo and drummer Vinnie Sperrazza.
Friday at the Buttonwood, it’s the Hartt School of Music: Classical Guitar Showcase. The Guitar Department at The Hartt School University of Hartford is the oldest performance-based guitar program in the country. The concert will feature ensemble and solo guitar music including guitar quartets, flute and guitar, as well as solos. Saturday night, the Eric Mintel Jazz Quartet, which played last year at the White House, performs favorite jazz tunes and originals. Sunday, and every Sunday, at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood Tree, Food Not Bombs serves vegetarian food. You’re invited to help prepare the meal at 11:30 a.m. at the First Church on Court.
Learn about all Buttonwood events at www.buttonwood.org.

Tonight, at Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts,  presents a festive concert of Ghanaian drumming and singing with Prof. Abraham Adzenyah and his advanced drumming class at Crowell Concert Hall.
Friday evening brings Music from East Asia to Wesleyan’s World Music Hall, featuring Wesleyan’s East Asian Ensembles presenting a variety of musical styles and repertories from East Asian cultures.
Also on Friday, at Crowell Concert Hall, there will be a West African dance concert, in which choreographer and Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka will be joined by students and guest artists for an invigorating performance showcasing the vibrancy of West African cultures through music and dance forms.

Saturday evening, at World Music Hall, it’s the Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble and Javanese dance performance, an orchestra of bronze gongs, xylophones, drums.

Sunday brings the Worlds of Dance performance  to Crowell Concert Hall. For more information, go to www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.

Tonight through Saturday, the Oddfellows Junior Reporatory Company will present Huck Finn at the Oddfellow Playhouse on Washington Street.

Tonight, down in New Haven at Toad’s Place it’s Dopapod; Soule Monde, featuring Ray Paczkowski + Russ Lawton of the Trey Anastasio Band; and The Mushroom Cloud. Friday, The Machine performs Pink Floyd. And Saturday it’s the Original Saturday Night Dance Party. More information about all Toad’s shows can be found at toadsplace.com.

At Café Nine in New Haven tonight it’s, Jazz Haven presents The New Unity Quintet.
Friday’s happy hour brings Malcolm Marsden, followed by a Tribute to the Anthology of American Folk Music, to benefit the CT Food Bank. The performance by an extensive roster of musicians pays tribute to an anthology compiled by folklorist, researcher and musicologist Harry Smith. Originally released as a three-record set in 1952, the anthology went on to influence folk musicians of the ’50s and ’60s, directly presaging the folk revival and providing a basis for folk and Americana musicians who followed. Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted by the Mike Coppola Trio. That will be followed by Oddball Events’ and Café Nine’s presentation of Andre Williams; w/ Barrence Whitfield & the Savages; and Bronson Rock. Sunday, Manic Productions Simone Felice; w/ Smoke Signals will be performing. More can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, it’s the Roots Music Series, a folk-blues show, brings Detroit Rebellion and The Grimm Generation. Friday, it’s Eddie Shaw & the Wolf Gang. It was the original backup band for Howlin’ Wolf until his death in 1975. Saturday brings Bad Rooster to Sallys.More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten track in Central Connecticut:

At Real Art Ways in Hartford, “Ingenious” continues through tonight, as does “Knuckleball”, the story of a handful of pitchers in the entire history of baseball. Opening Friday is The Loneliest Planet, in which a momentary misstep threatens to undo everything a young engaged couple believes about each other and themselves. Also opening Friday is Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters. Crewdson’s riveting photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single large-scale image. The film is a profile of the acclaimed artist, featuring fellow artists commenting on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images. Sunday brings Improvisations, the artist-curated performance series, to RealArtWays.Then on Sunday, the Story of Film: An Odyssey, concludes with Part 8: “Cinema Today and the Future” (2000s). This and more can be found atrealartways.org.

Tonight over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s cinema,begins “The Intouchables”, a comedy in which a caretaker to a quadriplegic Parisian aristocrat tries to break through his patient’s wall of loneliness.
Sunday begins a double-feature: Searching for Sugarman and Neil Young’s Journeys. For music and movie fans: one ticket, two unforgettable documentaries! Searching for Sugarman is about two South African fans’ search for Sixto Rodriguez, a ‘70s superstar who disappeared after rumors of an onstage suicide. Neil Young Journeys is directed by Jonathan Demme who gets the rock legend to share tales about his childhood and career, punctuated by classic songs as well as new ones. Learn more about what’s happening at cinestudio.org.

Now let’s look at what’s on tap here at WESU tonight.

Right after the Jive at 5,Thursday, 5:05-6pm
Homegrown with Rob DeRosa
The best crop of Connecticut-connected music presented for a global audience.


Free Speech Radio News From The Pacifica Network
Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.


Total Praise with Minister Latrecia
A diverse and inspirational blend of contemporary gospel music to uplift your spirit!


Evening Jazz with Bill Denert
Where hearing is the best experience. A broad range of swing, be-bop, and avant garde as well as a sprinkling of new releases.


Bridging the Gap with Jesse Brent
Exploring how music has changed forms through the years, and the links that tie together seemingly disparate genres such as blues and rap, or funk and Krautrock.


Alphabet Soup with DJ Blaze
An anti-genre, request-based melting pot. Each episode, we randomly select a letter from the alphabet, and play bands or artists whose names start with that letter. A wild romp through the annals of WESU’s music library, supported and guided by the interests of our listeners.


Bach Party with Canyon Girl
Bach Party will feature a unique theme each week showcasing work from a grand pool of classical composers and compositions. Tune in, remain composed, and keep it classy.


Hip-Hop Kitchen with Alex G
We play positivistic, afrocentric and jazz influenced hip-hop/rap that’s mixed with food news, recipes, reviews, tips, tricks, fun facts. Basically good food to eat while you listen to good hip-hop.


Songs Without Words with Jacob Feder
Songs Without Words offers an eclectic assortment of instrumental musics both new and old.


UnderCover with Rebecca Seidel
The best covers take original tracks and transform them into their own creations. Bridging genres, musical styles, and time, Undercover explores the concept of inspiration through imitation. Sometimes they surpass the original, sometimes they miss the mark – it’s your call.


Jack’s Jazz and Jam with DJ Jack
I will be playing music that features that blends styles, genres, and interesting melodic and harmonic arrangements. I would focus specifically on jazz and jazz influenced music, rock n’ roll, jam bands, bluegrass, funk, and any blending of the above genres.


Rock Fatale with DJ Stella
Featuring the first ladies of rock, from The Marvelettes to Metric.


Sunspot Loops
A sporadic exploration of what exists in music at the moment.


Corporate Radio Talk Show Live Superstar 9000 with \.com
The talk show that has the FCC raving! We never cease to disappoint.


The BBC World News Service kicks on at 4AM and we begin tomorrow’s broadcast at 5 a.m. with Morning Edition from NPR.


That’s all for today’s Jive at Five, if you didn’t get a chance to write down some of the information mentioned in our community calendar, the script is published online at www.wesufm.org/jive, and if you know of any events that you’d like to have announced on the Jive, send them tojive@wesufm.org If you tune in to WESU for information and music that you can’t find elsewhere, then we are counting on you to help support the service you depend on.

Please take a moment to make a donation of any size online at www.wesufm.org, every dollar counts and we need to hear from you.Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Homegrown with Rob DeRosa

11-27-12 Board Meeting Notes

WESU Board of Directors Meeting 11-27-12

 

Updates/ Old Business

-Tech stuff: Ben M replaced CD#2 and fixed input and TTs in studio B. Charles fixed TT1 in Studio A.  Ben ordered a new PC per the budget.

 

-The audio archiving Server equipment is here. Charles hooked up audio feed. Need to coordinate network hookup with developer. Can use it as a pitching point for the pledge drive.

-Adam . or BS meet up with the guy?

 

-Mary’s going abroad!!

-We need / VP for Spring… IDEAS? We should send an email hoping to get someone to be elected at meeting on Sunday. They could work with/learn from Mary up through break.

-EP? ER?

-Does this season count a season on air? Up for debate. Could make an exception? Up to the board.

-Arts Council of Greater New Haven: is offering grants to host an arts event in Hartford. Perhaps we could submit a concert proposal. We have a large audience in Hartford, particularly within the Caribbean Community- more on this later.

-One grant for one event that they’ll pick? Need to check out the details.

 

-Middletown remix / to be incorporated as jive sound track… / will change weekly… (Ben M can do this-make a soundtrack for each week)

-Spinitron volunteers?

-Chazelle is doing F and D!

-need strategies to do spinitron for automated shows (talk about at staff meeting); can offer this opportunity to trainees

-Pledge drive (Next Week AAACK!) (**WSHU Pledge drive will be stepping on our toes Dec 1-10!)

-Ben M working on letter – hope to get it printed and start folding tomorrow (trainees can come in and fold)

-Ben M working on finalizing premium offerings and donation levels for our donation form and online system.

-A QR code that takes people to the donation webpage

-Virgil: turn mailing into press release, this appeal letter can be modified into a press release. We need to get this to Middletown Eye, Middletown Patch, Wesleying, Argus, and Wesleyan Connection.

-Avery has written a letter to alumni and it will go to 500+ alumni out sometime between now and next Monday

-phone schedule- needs to be created and coordinated MARY!!!!!

-Dougie B! on air! Sat Dec 8 during Car Talk!

-premiums (use “Heist: Who Stole the American Dream” as a premium-for $35); long sleeve, new t-shirt, hoodies ($75) – $88.1 gets you a t-shirt and a hoody- in the future, figure out from a bank who their contact is for community supports

-next time: make a list of what WESU does for the community; matching donations from banks or lawyers possibly (but really we should check out money from doctors/dentists/bars/liquor stores/Metro)

-Textile Graphic talk! We picked T-Shirt Number 4!!!!!, Shirt design, and Hoody design (design 1 wins!!!!!) and colors (black hoody with white lettering)

-T-Shirt colors will be Brown ink “natural” off white?

 

-Agenda for Sunday meeting:

next year board positions

Need a VP

Sunday staff meeting agenda

Pledge drive Phones / promos / helping with other shows/ resources/ online donor system

 

-Film screenings: Mike  wants to co-host political documentary series; screen “Heist” and Avery’s documentary that she knows about

-outdoor movie showing (against the CFA)

 

-Concert Series:

-Concert Committee was “decidedly chill and supportive,” Zammuto (of the Books) is probably going to happen, 60 percent chance of Jeff from Neutral Milk Hotel (already sold out in Hartford, talk to Manic Productions-Feb. 7th/11th), Sidewalk Dave and Gifted Higgs both coming for 200 dollars each, Stepkids accepted for $1,500 but Concert Committee wants to offer $1,200 (dates? January/February-Jesse will ask for late February); Boldy wants $1,200 and CC will only give us a $1,000 (so WESU needs to front $500 total-could take out of new music budget, could charge public entry, could use record fair money, Colin Stetson (only available May 7th-the Tuesday before Spring Fling-we in?? sure.)

 

-Redesigning Website and moving everything over to wordpress (new.wesufm.org is the sample-check it out!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

 

-Interview with Sidewalk Dave

-he offered to play a free show before the concert series at Jesse’s house possibly open to the board

 

-thanks adrien for showing up!

Tuesday Nov. 27

 Good evening, it’s Tuesday, Nov. 27th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends.
I’m Isabelle Gauthier, host of the FUSS, a free form interview show with interesting people from the Middletown area. 
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Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:
At the Buttonwood Tree on Wednesday, it’s Karaoke w/ Deni.
Thursday brings The Music of Miles and Coltrane with the Noah Baerman Trio, featuring tenor saxophonist Jimmy Greene.
The program is presented in conjunction with pianist and educator Noah Baerman’s course on Miles and Coltrain through Wesleyan University’s Graduate Liberal Studies program, and there will be a demonstration and Q&A session preceding the concert. Joining him and Jimmy Greene will be bassist Henry Lugo and drummer Vinnie Sperrazza.
Friday at the Buttonwood, it’s the Hartt School of Music: Classical Guitar Showcase. The Guitar Department at The Hartt School University of Hartford is the oldest performance-based guitar program in the country. The concert will feature ensemble and solo guitar music including guitar quartets, flute and guitar, as well as solos.
Saturday night, the Eric Mintel Jazz Quartet, which played last year at the White House, performs favorite jazz tunes and originals.
Sunday, and every Sunday, at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood Tree, Food Not Bombs serves vegetarian food. You’re invited to help prepare the meal at 11:30 a.m. at the First Church on Court.
Learn about all Buttonwood events at www.buttonwood.org.
At Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts, Wednesday night brings the Braxton Ensemble Concert to Crowell Concert Hall.
Also on Wednesday, as part of the Adaptation Series, the film “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” starring Johnny Depp, will be screened at the Goldsmith Family Cinema in the Center for Film Studies. The Adaptation Series is a collaboration between the Friends of the Wesleyan Library and the Center for Film Studies to explore the transformation of literary texts to the movie screen. This adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s novel details his road trip across Western America searching for the “American Dream.”
Wednesday evening, an art lecture by University of Pennsylvania Prof. Andre Dombrowki will cover the relationship between Post-Impressionism and the history of modern, industrial time-keeping, focusing in particular on the advent of universal time in 1884 and Georges Seurat’s pointillist art technique developed around the same time. It will be held at 41 Wyllys Ave.,  Room 112.

On Thursday evening, the Wesleyan Center for the Arts presents a festive concert of Ghanaian drumming and singing with Prof. Abraham Adzenyah and his advanced drumming class at Crowell Concert Hall.
Friday evening brings Music from East Asia to Wesleyan’s World Music Hall, featuring Wesleyan’s East Asian Ensembles presenting a variety of musical styles and repertories from East Asian cultures.
Also on Friday, at Crowell Concert Hall, there will be a West African dance concert, in which choreographer and Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka will be joined by students and guest artists for an invigorating performance showcasing the vibrancy of West African cultures through music and dance forms.
Saturday evening, at World Music Hall, it’s the Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble and Javanese dance performance, an orchestra of bronze gongs, xylophones, drums.
Sunday brings the Worlds of Dance performance  to Crowell Concert Hall.
For more information, go to www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.
From Thursday through Saturday, the Oddfellows Junior Rep Company will present Huck Finn at the Oddfellow Playhouse on Washington Street.
Today, from 4-8pm at The Gallery in Glastonbury, there will be a JINGLE BELL MINGLE. Co-sponsored by the Glastonbury Chamber of Commerce and Women-Lead this free craft fair features over 30 vendors and local artisans.
Down in New Haven at Toad’s Place Wednesday brings the weekly EDM night.
Thursday, it’s Dopapod; Soule Monde, featuring Ray Paczkowski + Russ Lawton of the Trey Anastasio Band; and The Mushroom Cloud.
Friday, The Machine performs Pink Floyd.
And Saturday it’s the Original Saturday Night Dance Party.
More about all Toad’s shows at toadsplace.com.
At Café Nine in New Haven tonight, Manic Productions Presents: Mal Blum and Zoe Boekbinder; w/ An Historic; and Jacket Thor.
Wednesday, it’s Sugarbat; w/ Tet Offensive.
And Thursday, Jazz Haven presents New Unity Quintet.
Friday’s happy hour brings Malcolm Marsden, followed by a Tribute to the Anthology of American Folk Music, to benefit the CT Food Bank. The performance by an extensive roster of musicians pays tribute to an anthology compiled by folklorist, researcher and musicologist Harry Smith. Originally released as a three-record set in 1952, the anthology went on to influence folk musicians of the ’50s and ’60s, directly presaging the folk revival and providing a basis for folk and Americana musicians who followed.
Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted by the Mike Coppola Trio. That will be followed by Oddball Events’ and Café Nine’s presentation of Andre Williams; w/ Barrence Whitfield & the Savages; and Bronson Rock.
Sunday, Manic Productions Simone Felice; w/ Smoke Signals.
More can be found at cafenine.com.
Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, it’s Michael Palin’s Other Orchestra, an 18-piece band.
Wednesday, it’s the  blues jam with Tim McDonald, one of the longest running open blues jams in New England featuring a different host each week.
Thursday,  the Roots Music Series, a folk-blues show, brings Detroit Rebellion and The Grimm Generation.
Friday, it’s Eddie Shaw & the Wolf Gang. It was the original backup band for Howlin’ Wolf until his death in 1975.
Saturday brings Bad Rooster to Sallys.
More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.
Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten path in Central Connecticut.
At Real Art Ways in Hartford, Ingenious continues through Thursday, as does Knuckleball, the story of a handful of pitchers in the entire history of baseball.
Opening Friday is The Loneliest Planet, in which a momentary misstep threatens to undo everything a young engaged couple believes about each other and themselves.
Also opening Friday is Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters. Crewdson’s riveting photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single large-scale image. The film is a profile of the acclaimed artist, featuring fellow artists commenting on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.
Sunday brings Improvisations, the artist-curated performance series, to RealArtWays.
Then on Sunday, the Story of Film: An Odyssey, concludes with Part 8: “Cinema Today and the Future” (2000s).
More at realartways.org.
Tonight over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s cinema, is showing Easy Money.
Wednesday begins The Intouchables, a comedy in which a caretaker to a quadriplegic Parisian aristocrat tries to break through his patient’s wall of loneliness.
Sunday begins a double-feature: Searching for Sugarman and Neil Young’s Journeys. For music and movie fans: one ticket, two unforgettable documentaries! 
Searching for Sugarman is about two South African fans’ search for Sixto Rodriguez, a ‘70s superstar who disappeared after rumors of an onstage suicide.
Neil Young Journeys is directed by Jonathan Demme who gets the rock legend to share tales about his childhood and career, punctuated by classic songs as well as new ones.
Learn more at cinestudio.org.

Now let’s look at what’s on tap here at WESU tonight.

 Right after the Jive At Five from 5:05 to 6:00pm it’s Sounds From the Global Village with Jason M. Longwell from Pacifica

From 6-6:30 is Free Speech Radio news from the Pacifica Network

From 6:30-8:00 is Acoustic Blender with Bill Revill

From 8-9pm is The Voice of the CITY with J-Cherry

From 9-10:30 is Wonderland with DJ Cheshire Cat

From 10:30-11:30 is Record Roulette with Avery

From 11:30pm-12:30 am is Hardly Strictly Bluegrass with DJ Sleepy Girl

Wednesday, 12:30-1:30am is The Boss, with DJ Moe

Wednesday, 1:30-2:30am is Six Degrees of Separation with Monica Kornis

and from 2:30-3:30 is Vynlville with DJ Johnny

And that’s all for today’s Jive At Five. Tune in each weekday at 4:55 pm to hear about what’s going on in the community and on the air right here at 88.1 FM WESU, a community service of Wesleyan University since 1939.

The written form for what you’ve heard on today’s jive is online at www.WESUfm.org/jive

And if you value WESU as a source for information and entertainment in your life, how about supporting the station with a donation? You can make that donation online at wesufm.org anytime. Dont forget to tune in next week during our pledge drive, where you can donate online, or by phone. Thanks for listening!

Mon., Nov. 26 Jive


Good evening, it’s Monday, Nov. 26th, and this is the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends.
I’m Maria Johnson, host of Reasonably Catholic: Keeping the Faith, which airs every 1st, 3rd and 5th Tuesday, from 4 to 4:55, right before the Jive. It’s a thoughtful discussion of progressive issues of faith and action, with interviews and commentary. Look for it next on Tues., Dec. 4, WESU’s pledge week, when we’ll try to put your propensity to suffer Catholic guilt to use in a good cause!
There will be autographed copies of pioneering feminist theologian Rosemary Radford Ruether’s books, as well as Catholic music CDs and issues of the progressive newspaper Today’s American Catholic, among other goodies, offered as rewards for pledging.
Thanks for tuning in and being as generous as you can.
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Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:
At the Buttonwood Tree tonight, it’s the weekly “Anything Goes” Open Mic night.
Wednesday at the Buttonwood, it’s Karaoke w/ Deni.
Thursday brings The Music of Miles and Coltrane with the Noah Baerman Trio, featuring tenor saxophonist Jimmy Greene.
The program is presented in conjunction with pianist and educator Noah Baerman’s course on Miles and Coltrain through Wesleyan University’s Graduate Liberal Studies program, and there will be a demonstration and Q&A session preceding the concert. Joining him and Jimmy Greene will be bassist Henry Lugo and drummer Vinnie Sperrazza.
Friday at the Buttonwood, it’s the Hartt School of Music: Classical Guitar Showcase. The Guitar Department at The Hartt School University of Hartford is the oldest performance-based guitar program in the country. The concert will feature ensemble and solo guitar music including guitar quartets, flute and guitar, as well as solos.
Saturday night, the Eric Mintel Jazz Quartet, which played last year at the White House, performs favorite jazz tunes and originals.
Sunday, and every Sunday, at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood Tree, Food Not Bombs serves vegetarian food. You’re invited to help prepare the meal at 11:30 a.m. at the First Church on Court.
Learn about all Buttonwood events at www.buttonwood.org.
At Wesleyan’s Center for the Arts, Wednesday night brings the Braxton Ensemble Concert to Crowell Concert Hall.
Also on Wednesday, as part of the Adaptation Series, the film “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,” starring Johnny Depp, will be screened at the Goldsmith Family Cinema in the Center for Film Studies. The Adaptation Series is a collaboration between the Friends of the Wesleyan Library and the Center for Film Studies to explore the transformation of literary texts to the movie screen. This adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s novel details his road trip across Western America searching for the “American Dream.”
Wednesday evening, an art lecture by University of Pennsylvania Prof. Andre Dombrowki will cover the relationship between Post-Impressionism and the history of modern, industrial time-keeping, focusing in particular on the advent of universal time in 1884 and Georges Seurat’s pointillist art technique developed around the same time. It will be held at 41 Wyllys Ave.,  Room 112.
On Thursday evening, the Wesleyan Center for the Arts presents a festive concert of Ghanaian drumming and singing with Prof. Abraham Adzenyah and his advanced drumming class at Crowell Concert Hall.
Friday evening brings Music from East Asia to Wesleyan’s World Music Hall, featuring Wesleyan’s East Asian Ensembles presenting a variety of musical styles and repertories from East Asian cultures.
Also on Friday, at Crowell Concert Hall, there will be a West African dance concert, in which choreographer and Artist in Residence Iddi Saaka will be joined by students and guest artists for an invigorating performance showcasing the vibrancy of West African cultures through music and dance forms.
Saturday evening, at World Music Hall, it’s the Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble and Javanese dance performance, an orchestra of bronze gongs, xylophones, drums.
Sunday brings the Worlds of Dance performance  to Crowell Concert Hall.
For more information, go to www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.
From Thursday through Saturday, the Oddfellows Junior Rep Company will present Huck Finn at the Oddfellow Playhouse on Washington Street.
Tomorrow from 4-8pm at The Gallery in Glastonbury, there will be a JINGLE BELL MINGLE. Co-sponsored by the Glastonbury Chamber of Commerce and Women-Lead this free craft fair features over 30 vendors and local artisans.
Down in New Haven at Toad’s Place tonight, it’s A Night of Smooth Jazz with Rohn Lawrence & Friends.
Wednesday brings the weekly EDM night.
Thursday, it’s Dopapod; Soule Monde, featuring Ray Paczkowski + Russ Lawton of the Trey Anastasio Band; and The Mushroom Cloud.
Friday, The Machine performs Pink Floyd.
And Saturday it’s the Original Saturday Night Dance Party.
More about all Toad’s shows at toadsplace.com.
At Café Nine in New Haven tonight, it’s the Acoustic Open Mic Night.
Tomorrow, Manic Productions Presents: Mal Blum and Zoe Boekbinder; w/ An Historic; and Jacket Thor.
Wednesday, it’s Sugarbat; w/ Tet Offensive.
And Thursday, Jazz Haven presents New Unity Quintet.
Friday’s happy hour brings Malcolm Marsden, followed by a Tribute to the Anthology of American Folk Music, to benefit the CT Food Bank. The performance by an extensive roster of musicians pays tribute to an anthology compiled by folklorist, researcher and musicologist Harry Smith. Originally released as a three-record set in 1952, the anthology went on to influence folk musicians of the ’50s and ’60s, directly presaging the folk revival and providing a basis for folk and Americana musicians who followed.
Saturday’s Afternoon Jazz Jam will be hosted by the Mike Coppola Trio. That will be followed by Oddball Events’ and Café Nine’s presentation of Andre Williams; w/ Barrence Whitfield & the Savages; and Bronson Rock.
Sunday, Manic Productions Simone Felice; w/ Smoke Signals.
More can be found at cafenine.com.
Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, it’s Jazz Monday, the best taste of live jazz in Hartford.
Tomorrow brings Michael Palin’s Other Orchestra, an 18-piece band, to Sally’s.
Wednesday, it’s the  blues jam with Tim McDonald, one of the longest running open blues jams in New England featuring a different host each week.
Thursday,  the Roots Music Series, a folk-blues show, brings Detroit Rebellion and The Grimm Generation.
Friday, it’s Eddie Shaw & the Wolf Gang. It was the original backup band for Howlin’ Wolf until his death in 1975.
Saturday brings Bad Rooster to Sallys.
More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.
Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten path in Central Connecticut.
At Real Art Ways in Hartford, Ingenious continues through Thursday, as does Knuckleball, the story of a handful of pitchers in the entire history of baseball.
Opening Friday is The Loneliest Planet, in which a momentary misstep threatens to undo everything a young engaged couple believes about each other and themselves.
Also opening Friday is Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters. Crewdson’s riveting photographs are elaborately staged, elegant narratives compressed into a single large-scale image. The film is a profile of the acclaimed artist, featuring fellow artists commenting on the motivation behind their friend’s haunting images.
Sunday brings Improvisations, the artist-curated performance series, to RealArtWays.
Then on Sunday, the Story of Film: An Odyssey, concludes with Part 8: “Cinema Today and the Future” (2000s).
More at realartways.org.
Tonight over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s cinema, Easy Money runs through tomorrow. 
Wednesday begins The Intouchables, a comedy in which a caretaker to a quadriplegic Parisian aristocrat tries to break through his patient’s wall of loneliness.
Sunday begins a double-feature: Searching for Sugarman and Neil Young’s Journeys. For music and movie fans: one ticket, two unforgettable documentaries!  
Searching for Sugarman is about two South African fans’ search for Sixto Rodriguez, a ‘70s superstar who disappeared after rumors of an onstage suicide.
Neil Young Journeys is directed by Jonathan Demme who gets the rock legend to share tales about his childhood and career, punctuated by classic songs as well as new ones.
Learn more at cinestudio.org.
Now let’s look at what’s on tap here at WESU tonight.
Right after the Jive at 5,from 5:05 to 6, it’s
Afternoon Jazz with Charles Henry, a well-rounded jazz show for true jazz heads.
From 6-6:30pm:
Free Speech Radio News from The Pacifica Network
Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting.
From 6:30-8pm:
75% Folk with Michael Benson, followed by
Rumpus Room with Lord Lewis
Then from 8-9:30pm it’s Anvil Isle with Nate
From 9:30-11:30pm:
The Attention Deficit Disk Jockey with Lee
From 11:30pm-12:30am:
The Noisy Wheelbarrow with Zach Schonfeld and DJ Meat Pie
From 12:30-1:30am:
Bazaar Sounds with Mac Taylor
From 1:30-2:30am:
Live From The Paris Hotel with The Sparrow
From 2:30-3:30am:
Maximum Rock and Roll Radio
From 3:30-4am:                 
DJ Vegetable Reads Missed Connections
The BBC World News Service kicks on at 4AM and we begin tomorrow’s broadcast at 5 a.m. with Morning Edition from NPR.
That’s all for today’s Jive at Five, if you didn’t get a chance to write down some of the information mentioned in our community calendar, the script is published online at www.wesufm.org/jive, and if you know of any events that you’d like to have announced on the Jive, send them tojive@wesufm.org If you tune in to WESU for information and music that you can’t find elsewhere, then we are counting on you to help support the service you depend on.
Please take a moment to make a donation of any size online at www.wesufm.org, every dollar counts and we need to hear from you. Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Afternoon Jazz with Charles Henry.

WESU Radio 200: Menahan Street Band on Top

Here’s our latest chart for CMJ:

1    MENAHAN STREET BAND    The Crossing    Dunham
2    TIM MAIA    World Psychedelic Classics 4: Nobody Can Live Forever: The Existential Soul Of Tim Maia    Luaka Bop
3    CHILD ACTOR    Victory    Fake Four
4    BEST COAST    The Only Place    Mexican Summer

Click through to see the rest of the chart, featuring The Evens, Brian Eno, NON/Boyd Rice & Main Attrakionz

5    EVENS    The Odds    Dischord
6    METRIC    Synthetica    Mom And Pop-MMI
7    GRIZZLY BEAR    Shields    Warp
8    FOUR TET    Pink    Text
9    METZ    Metz    SUB POP

10    BRIAN ENO    Lux    Warp
11    LUKID    Lonely At The Top    Werkdiscs
12    TOY LOVE    Live At The Gluepot 1980    Goner
13    SKY FERREIRA    Ghost    Capitol
14    OF MONTREAL    Daughter Of Cloud    Polyvinyl
15    THE XX    Coexist    XL
16    JOSEPHINE FOSTER    Blood Rushing    Fire

17    NON/BOYD RICE    Back To Mono    Mute
18    ANTIBALAS    Antibalas    Daptone
19    CONVERGE    All We Love We Leave Behind    Epitaph
20    DIRTY PROJECTORS    About To Die    Domino
21    BROTHER ALI    Mourning In America And Dreaming In Color    Rhymesayers
22    ROC MARCIANO    Reloaded    Decon
23    SIDEWALK DAVE    Hard On Romance    Telegraph

24    MAIN ATTRAKIONZ    Bossalinis And Fooliyones    young one
25    ALLAH-LAS    Allah-las    Innovative Leisure
26    CLINIC    Free Reign    Domino
27    PEOPLES TEMPLE    More For The Masses    Hozac
28    TAME IMPALA    Lonerism    Modular
29    TY SEGALL    Twins    Drag City
30    KENDRICK LAMAR    Good Kid In A M.A.A.d City    Aftermath-Top Dawg-Interscope

WESU Radio 200: Menahan Street Band on Top

Here’s our latest chart for CMJ:

1    MENAHAN STREET BAND    The Crossing    Dunham
2    TIM MAIA    World Psychedelic Classics 4: Nobody Can Live Forever: The Existential Soul Of Tim Maia    Luaka Bop
3    CHILD ACTOR    Victory    Fake Four
4    BEST COAST    The Only Place    Mexican Summer

Click through to see the rest of the chart, featuring The Evens, Brian Eno, NON/Boyd Rice & Main Attrakionz

5    EVENS    The Odds    Dischord
6    METRIC    Synthetica    Mom And Pop-MMI
7    GRIZZLY BEAR    Shields    Warp
8    FOUR TET    Pink    Text
9    METZ    Metz    SUB POP

10    BRIAN ENO    Lux    Warp
11    LUKID    Lonely At The Top    Werkdiscs
12    TOY LOVE    Live At The Gluepot 1980    Goner
13    SKY FERREIRA    Ghost    Capitol
14    OF MONTREAL    Daughter Of Cloud    Polyvinyl
15    THE XX    Coexist    XL
16    JOSEPHINE FOSTER    Blood Rushing    Fire

17    NON/BOYD RICE    Back To Mono    Mute
18    ANTIBALAS    Antibalas    Daptone
19    CONVERGE    All We Love We Leave Behind    Epitaph
20    DIRTY PROJECTORS    About To Die    Domino
21    BROTHER ALI    Mourning In America And Dreaming In Color    Rhymesayers
22    ROC MARCIANO    Reloaded    Decon
23    SIDEWALK DAVE    Hard On Romance    Telegraph

24    MAIN ATTRAKIONZ    Bossalinis And Fooliyones    young one
25    ALLAH-LAS    Allah-las    Innovative Leisure
26    CLINIC    Free Reign    Domino
27    PEOPLES TEMPLE    More For The Masses    Hozac
28    TAME IMPALA    Lonerism    Modular
29    TY SEGALL    Twins    Drag City
30    KENDRICK LAMAR    Good Kid In A M.A.A.d City    Aftermath-Top Dawg-Interscope

Fri., Nov. 23rd, Jive

Good evening, it’s Friday, Nov 23rd, and this is the day-after-Thanksgiving edition of the Jive at Five – WESU’s Daily community calendar and rundown of night time programming here on 88.1 FM WESU Middletown, your station for NPR, Pacifica, independent and local public affairs by day and the best in free-form community programming week nights and weekends. I’m Maria Johnson, host of Reasonably Catholic: Keeping the Faith, which airs every 1st, 3rd and 5th Tuesday, from 4 to 4:55, right before the Jive. It’s a thoughtful discussion of progressive issues of faith and action, with interviews and commentary. Look for it next on Dec. 4, when I’ll have a special pledge-week interview with pioneering feminist Catholic theologian Rosemary Radford Ruether. There will be autographed copies of her books, as well as Catholic music CDs and issues of the progressive newspaper Today’s American Catholic offered as gifts for pledging.
Thanks for tuning in.

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Here’s a rundown of some of what’s happening in our area:

At the Buttonwood Tree in Middletown tomorrow at 8pm, the jazz trio UPSTREAM with Frank Varela, Rick Marshall and Bob Laramie will lead a mind-boggling improvisational excursion.Sunday, and every Sunday, at about 1 p.m. in front of the Buttonwood Tree, Food Not Bombs serves vegetarian food. You’re invited to help prepare the meal at 11:30 a.m. at the First Church on Court Street and all are welcome to the meal.
Learn about all Buttonwood events at www.buttonwood.org

This afternoon, Middletown’s Holiday on Main events kicked off and although some of the festivities will have wrapped up by now, there’s still time to catch other ones.  Four tree lightings are planned. Also, till 8 tonight, there’s a free holiday crafts fair at the MAC650 Gallery, a chance to support the local economy and local artists with your holiday dollars! Baked goods and hot beverages provided!

Also till 8 p.m., the Middletown Lions Club will be staffing the popcorn-and-hot-pretzel stand in front of the Chamber. Holiday music will be played by Harvest Woods Audio.

Haitis’ Back Porch, a very cool gift shop which gives all of its profits to Haiti, will be having its After Thanksgiving Sale, with 20 percent everything except paintings. The store, located at 100 Riverview Plaza, off of Main St., is open till 8 tonight, and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. What better way to celebrate Small Busienss Saturday than by helping the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere?

Tomorrow’s Holiday on Main festivities continue with various civic and school organizations manning the booths along Main Street. There will be a visit by Santa; free hayrides along Main Street;  and free train rides on the sidewalk around downtown.

Down in New Haven at Toad’s Place tonight Manic Productions presents Bomb the Music Industry, with The World is a Beautiful Place & I am No Longer Afraid to Die; Hop Along; and LVL UP.
Tomorrow, NRBQ comes to Toad’s, along with Remember September and DizzyFish.
More about all Toad’s shows at toadsplace.com.

At Café Nine in New Haven tonight, Sal Paradise plays during happy hour, followed by the Casa de Warrenton presentation of You Scream I Scream; w/ MT Bearington and Weird Beards.
Tomorrow, the Afternoon Jazz Jam is hosted by George Baker, followed by the Duke Robillard Band; w/ Paul Gabriel.Then Sunday, it’s the Sunday-After-Supper Jam with host Kevin St. James and the Legendary Cafe Nine All-Stars.More can be found at cafenine.com.

Up in Hartford at Blackeyed Sally’s tonight, Christine Ohlman & Rebel Montez take the Sally’s stage.
And tomorrow, it’s Roxy Perry’s All Star Revue.
More can be found at blackeyedsallys.com.

Now let’s take a look at cinema off the beaten path in Central Connecticut.
At Real Art Ways in Hartford, Photographic Memory continues tonight.and tomorrow; it’s a screening of Ingenious, in which a small-time inventor of clever but impractical products finally comes up with the Big Idea, the one he’s been waiting for to save his business and marriage. Wild money-raising schemes ensue. Tonight and tomorrow also brings the Best of the New York International Children’s Film Festival, a family favorite, to Real Art Ways. This colorful collection of short films from around the world features audience and jury favorites from the 2012 festival and is suited for children ages 4 to 8. Tonight through most of next week, it’s Knuckleball, the story of a handful of pitchers in the entire history of baseball who throw a ball so slowly and unpredictably that no one wants anything to do with it.Then on Sunday, the Story of Film: An Odyssey continues with Part 7, “New Boundaries: World Cinema in Africa, Asia, Latin America” and “New American Independents & the Digital Revolution.”More details can be found at realartways.org.

Tonight over at Cinestudio, Trinity College’s cinema, screenings continue of The Master in 4K, in which a charismatic trickster played by Philip Seymour Hoffman claims to heal people by separating them from the trauma of past lives. Then Sunday through Tuesday, it’s Easy Money, a Swedish thriller which director Martin Scorsese helped bring to the States. It’s described as sharing with the best gangster movies a sense of morality and a critique of society. Learn more at cinestudio.org.

For those looking for alternative holiday shopping after the holiday, tomorrow at 9am Sheehan High School in Wallingford hosts a Vendor Fair to benefit their Music Department which is free to shoppers. And on Tuesday, Nov. 27th from 4-8pm at The Gallery in Glastonbury, there is a JINGLE BELL MINGLE. Co-sponsored by the Glastonbury Chamber of Commerce and Women-Lead this free craft fair features over 30 vendors and local artisans.

Now let’s look at what’s on tap here at WESU tonight.

Right after the Jive at 5,from 5:05 to 6, it’s Wild Wild Livewith MC Apper
A sneak peek into the magical live music scene of Wes. Tune in for in-station sets from campus bands and recordings of up-and-coming artists’ campus shows.

Friday, 6-6:30pm
Free Speech Radio News From The Pacifica Network
Your daily dose of alternative international news and reporting from the Pacifica Network.

Friday, 6:30-7pm
Middletown Youth Radio Project
A weekly radio program featuring the thoughts, voices, creativity and talent of the kids in the WESU neighborhood.

Friday, 7-8:30pm
Universal Sound Wave with Sista Queen T
Informing listeners about local and global issues with health, nutrition, and stress reduction tips, featuring a wide range of music including African, reggae, gospel, R&B, Latin, and blues.

Friday, 8:30-10pm
From The Otherside with Rok-A-Dee
The Voice of Hartford, including local artists that from Connecticut, New York, Massachussetts and Rhode Island. Also features upcoming artists performing Caribbean R & B, Soca and International music.

Friday, 10-Midnigh
Rumba en el Patio with Michael
Classic Salsa for the dancers, Afro-Latin Big Band for the discerning ear. Join us as we adventure through the history of Musica Latina!

Saturday, Midnight-1:30am
N.E. Tempo with DJ Berk
Serious turntablism – Dubstep, DnB, techno, ragga jungle, breakbeats mixed live.

Saturday, 1:30-3am
In the Master Bedroom, Under the Bed with Dope Dave
Celebrating conscious hip-hop and its offshoots & influences. Acrobatic emcees and down-tempo poets mix it up over varied oceans of sound.

Saturday, 3-4am
Bassment Beats with DJ Lokash
The Real Hip Hop is over here.

The BBC World News Service kicks on at 4AM and we begin tomorrow’s broadcast at 5 a.m. with Morning Edition from NPR.

That’s all for today’s Jive at Five, if you didn’t get a chance to write down some of the information mentioned in our community calendar, the script is published online at www.wesufm.org/jive, and if you know of any events that you’d like to have announced on the Jive, send them tojive@wesufm.org If you tune in to WESU for information and music that you can’t find elsewhere, then we are counting on you to help support the service you depend on.

Please take a moment to make a donation of any size online at www.wesufm.org, every dollar counts and we need to hear from you.Thanks for listening and stay tuned for Wild Wild Live with MC Apper.

An Interview with Sidewalk Dave: Bee Mating, Abandoning Folk for Rock & Roll & Miya’s Sushi

I’ve been a Sidewalk Dave fan for a while now, and have already written about him in posts here and here. Today, I interviewed Dave on the phone. We talked about a wide range of topics from the inspiration of bee mating for his new record, to his recent shift in musical approach from folk to rock, to the importance of the great Miya’s Sushi in his life, and his new experimental side project, Sasquatch Fucker.

Click through to read the interview

JB: Let me start out with the “Honey Bee” video, which I just watched and thought was a cool concept. I was wondering actually, have you seen something called Green Porno?
SD: Green what?
JB: Green porno.
SD: You mean like pornography?
JB: Yeah.
SD: No.
JB: OK. Well I recommend you check it out because I think it’s sort of similar to the concept you had for that video. Do you know who Isabella Rossellini is?
SD: No.
JB: She’s an actress and she’s a pretty bizarre person. And she makes these videos where she dresses up as different animals—a lot of them are insects. And shows how they mate. (laughs) And she has one for bees which is really fantastic.
SD: Ah I wish I knew that.
JB: Yeah yeah so what happens in the video. The man bee mates with the woman bee and he loses his penis. The penis gets stuck in the woman bee. So she becomes the new queen. And then he bleeds to death. So would you say that that idea had anything to do with that song?
SD: Yeah that had everything to do with it. I was reading the Biology of the Honey Bee, a book, while I was traveling. I was reading through it and I was in the middle when I was about to start recording Hard On Romance. So I went to the section about mating and I read all that. And it’s the most fucked up mating process I’ve ever heard. (laughs). These bees, their only purpose is to mate with the queen and when they do they get killed and all their friends do the same thing and actually it’s like a big orgy.
JB: Yeah. And they also fight with each other and some of them die.
SD: Yeah totally. I was just thinking about Romeo and Juliette being one of the most tragic love stories and then I was like, that’s not fucking tragic (laughs). I like to go with extremes and that seems pretty extreme for me. That helped form the whole album. You’re totally right. “When I cum I bleed” [lyric from his song "Honey Bee"]. All that stuff.
JB: So I’ve been looking at your website and I saw you put in a couple articles about Ty Segalland Tame Impala, who I think both released fantastic albums this year—in Ty Segall’s case three really good albums. And both of them I think are on the forefront of this movement of going back to the basics, making old school garage psych albums that sort of sound like they were released 40 years ago. So would you consider yourself to be a part of that movement at all?
SD: I had the idea for the sound of the record last year. I was already demo-ing stuff that way. I’ve always been trying to keep lo fi and get hi fi as well. High fidelity lo fi recordings…There’s a difference between that and the other way around, you know? I didn’t think about any scene but when those albums came out I was really pumped because they’re in the vein of types of sounds I look for in the music that I make. It was just cool to feel not alone. Not that it’s that far out there. I knew that I was trying to get away from folk, which is something that Ty Segall has also seemed to do. Goodbye Bread had more acoustic guitar. It was rockin’ too, but it was lo-fi folky.
JB: Do you think that you’ve abandoned folk music for good, or do you think you might eventually go back to that?
SD: I haven’t burned my acoustic guitar or anything. I’m definitely not interested in it really right now. I think it’s more likely I’ll get further away from it than go back to it. But I think those songs are good. Those songs are always in me. I just don’t know of a new way to do it right now. Until I find a new and exciting way to make folk songs again I don’t really want to go back to my roots just for the sake of nostalgia.
JB: It seems like there have been a lot of changes in your life recently. Not only did you switch styles pretty drastically but you moved from New Haven to Brooklyn. I was just wondering what that’s been like? Do you foresee staying in Brooklyn for a while or ever coming back to New Haven?
SD: I’m in New Haven still a lot. I still work at Miya’s and my record label is in New London. So I still feel very connected to New Haven and Connecticut. But it’s a big scene in New York and there’s a lot of exciting stuff going on. I don’t think you can check that out quickly, you know? I’ve been coming to New York and falling in love with New York for years and I kind of always knew I’d end up here. But in New Haven, the scene is so promising and so potent for how small the population is. So I’m lucky in that way. I feel like society breeds you to go through phases. Ever since you’re a kid, you’re 4 years old and then you go to preschool and then four years later you’re in another school and four years later you’re in another school, and you do your undergrad and that takes four years. And then, since I graduated in 2008 or 9, it’s been at least four years with this band, and it was just time for a change.
JB: From your website’s bio, you say that you traveled around a lot when you were a teenager. So what were some of the better and worse experiences you had when you were doing that?
SD: I lived in Iowa when I was four to eight years old. All the memories from that time in my life are really beautiful. I lived in a trailer park. And then we made money and we built this big house and it was really contrast-y. I moved to Switzerland. All of a sudden my world changed. My memories are really vivid. It was a lot of adventures and staying out until sunset and then riding bikes down long roads with fields. That was one of my better memories. And then living in North Carolina was pretty awful. In contrast, it’s a really beautiful place. We lived in the mountains. But we were poor and I was picked on and the people were not that nice where we were.
JB: And what brought you to New Haven originally?
SD: I got a swimming scholarship to Southern Connecticut State University. It was the only school I got into and it was only because of swimming. My grades were really bad for the first two years. At that point I was already living on my own. My mom moved to Kansas when I was 16. I didn’t have anywhere else to go. I just figured I may as well live on some school loans and live in a dormitory for free basically. Well, not free. I had to pay it back. I knew about The Space. I knew the owner of The Space somehow through my mother.
JB: And then how did you start working at Miya’s?
SD: Our guitar player, who you saw play with us in New York, he worked there, and our drummer got in a motorcycle accident. So I couldn’t work for like a month and then I didn’t have money and I was living at the rehearsal space. And then our guitar player, who was already playing with us a little bit, said that he could get me a job there because he worked there. They saved my life. They really treat you like family.
JB: That’s my favorite restaurant in the world. I love that place. Do you think you’ll try to keep working there for a while, or do you eventually want to make your whole living off music? Do you think that’s feasible?
SD: I want to spend as much time playing and working on that stuff as I can. So I want to work as little as possible or not at all. It used to be a goal of mine to live off music, but I don’t know if I’m interested in spending my time trying to make that happen. I’d rather just spend my time trying to have the time. So right now Miya’s takes good care of me and I don’t have anything in New York that’s coming up right now that will allow me to be as flexible with my schedule as I am with them and make as much money quickly. I’m not actively trying to stop working at Miya’s. But, I don’t know if in a year I might want to stop commuting.
JB: So I saw on Facebook, you recently debuted a side project called Sasquatch Fucker. (laughs)
SD: Yeah, Sasquatch Fucker is kind of this art installment…a very crass art installment band. It’s just me and this guy I work with at Miya’s.
JB: Dave Corsack.
SD: Yep. So every once in a while, usually when he’s fighting with his girlfriend or breaking up with her, he all of a sudden has time, and then we go to his storage space rehearsal cube and we play blistering, loud music about really, really crass and tasteless things. And we speak in Southern accents and we have stage personas. But that was the first time we did it live and it was really spur of the moment and half the people really, really hated it. And half the people really, really loved it. So, I think that was a success.
JB: Yeah, you always want to have strong feelings as opposed to indifference.
SD: Right right. Because even the people who hate it are talking about it. They’re like, Sidewalk Dave is totally making a fool of himself or a fool of us or not taking it seriously anymore. At least they’re talking about it.
JB: You recently donated a song to a benefit compilation for Hurricane Sandy. I just wanted to know what your experience with the storm was, and how it affected people you knew in New York or elsewhere.
SD: A lot of the people I know personally weren’t in any sort of emergency state, and for me it was like a windy night. I didn’t know how bad it was until the next day when it was on the news. And then to better understand the effect it had, I went and volunteered in Rockaway in Queens that was hit really, really bad, and those people are still homeless and still screwed up, and I’m trying to go once a week if I can, even though I haven’t been in the city, to go and volunteer. It’s worse than people think in a lot of ways. So I was really excited and jumped at the chance to be on the compilation, and I hope it does well. I don’t know about the Red Cross, though. I don’t know how much help they were at the beginning. They might be doing better stuff now. But that’s where the money’s going. I don’t know if I agree with that completely, but it’s better than nothing I suppose.

An Interview with Sidewalk Dave: Bee Mating, Abandoning Folk for Rock & Roll & Miya’s Sushi

I’ve been a Sidewalk Dave fan for a while now, and have already written about him in posts here and here. Today, I interviewed Dave on the phone. We talked about a wide range of topics from the inspiration of bee mating for his new record, to his recent shift in musical approach from folk to rock, to the importance of the great Miya’s Sushi in his life, and his new experimental side project, Sasquatch Fucker.

Click through to read the interview

JB: Let me start out with the “Honey Bee” video, which I just watched and thought was a cool concept. I was wondering actually, have you seen something called Green Porno?
SD: Green what?
JB: Green porno.
SD: You mean like pornography?
JB: Yeah.
SD: No.
JB: OK. Well I recommend you check it out because I think it’s sort of similar to the concept you had for that video. Do you know who Isabella Rossellini is?
SD: No.
JB: She’s an actress and she’s a pretty bizarre person. And she makes these videos where she dresses up as different animals—a lot of them are insects. And shows how they mate. (laughs) And she has one for bees which is really fantastic.
SD: Ah I wish I knew that.
JB: Yeah yeah so what happens in the video. The man bee mates with the woman bee and he loses his penis. The penis gets stuck in the woman bee. So she becomes the new queen. And then he bleeds to death. So would you say that that idea had anything to do with that song?
SD: Yeah that had everything to do with it. I was reading the Biology of the Honey Bee, a book, while I was traveling. I was reading through it and I was in the middle when I was about to start recording Hard On Romance. So I went to the section about mating and I read all that. And it’s the most fucked up mating process I’ve ever heard. (laughs). These bees, their only purpose is to mate with the queen and when they do they get killed and all their friends do the same thing and actually it’s like a big orgy.
JB: Yeah. And they also fight with each other and some of them die.
SD: Yeah totally. I was just thinking about Romeo and Juliette being one of the most tragic love stories and then I was like, that’s not fucking tragic (laughs). I like to go with extremes and that seems pretty extreme for me. That helped form the whole album. You’re totally right. “When I cum I bleed” [lyric from his song "Honey Bee"]. All that stuff.
JB: So I’ve been looking at your website and I saw you put in a couple articles about Ty Segalland Tame Impala, who I think both released fantastic albums this year—in Ty Segall’s case three really good albums. And both of them I think are on the forefront of this movement of going back to the basics, making old school garage psych albums that sort of sound like they were released 40 years ago. So would you consider yourself to be a part of that movement at all?
SD: I had the idea for the sound of the record last year. I was already demo-ing stuff that way. I’ve always been trying to keep lo fi and get hi fi as well. High fidelity lo fi recordings…There’s a difference between that and the other way around, you know? I didn’t think about any scene but when those albums came out I was really pumped because they’re in the vein of types of sounds I look for in the music that I make. It was just cool to feel not alone. Not that it’s that far out there. I knew that I was trying to get away from folk, which is something that Ty Segall has also seemed to do. Goodbye Bread had more acoustic guitar. It was rockin’ too, but it was lo-fi folky.
JB: Do you think that you’ve abandoned folk music for good, or do you think you might eventually go back to that?
SD: I haven’t burned my acoustic guitar or anything. I’m definitely not interested in it really right now. I think it’s more likely I’ll get further away from it than go back to it. But I think those songs are good. Those songs are always in me. I just don’t know of a new way to do it right now. Until I find a new and exciting way to make folk songs again I don’t really want to go back to my roots just for the sake of nostalgia.
JB: It seems like there have been a lot of changes in your life recently. Not only did you switch styles pretty drastically but you moved from New Haven to Brooklyn. I was just wondering what that’s been like? Do you foresee staying in Brooklyn for a while or ever coming back to New Haven?
SD: I’m in New Haven still a lot. I still work at Miya’s and my record label is in New London. So I still feel very connected to New Haven and Connecticut. But it’s a big scene in New York and there’s a lot of exciting stuff going on. I don’t think you can check that out quickly, you know? I’ve been coming to New York and falling in love with New York for years and I kind of always knew I’d end up here. But in New Haven, the scene is so promising and so potent for how small the population is. So I’m lucky in that way. I feel like society breeds you to go through phases. Ever since you’re a kid, you’re 4 years old and then you go to preschool and then four years later you’re in another school and four years later you’re in another school, and you do your undergrad and that takes four years. And then, since I graduated in 2008 or 9, it’s been at least four years with this band, and it was just time for a change.
JB: From your website’s bio, you say that you traveled around a lot when you were a teenager. So what were some of the better and worse experiences you had when you were doing that?
SD: I lived in Iowa when I was four to eight years old. All the memories from that time in my life are really beautiful. I lived in a trailer park. And then we made money and we built this big house and it was really contrast-y. I moved to Switzerland. All of a sudden my world changed. My memories are really vivid. It was a lot of adventures and staying out until sunset and then riding bikes down long roads with fields. That was one of my better memories. And then living in North Carolina was pretty awful. In contrast, it’s a really beautiful place. We lived in the mountains. But we were poor and I was picked on and the people were not that nice where we were.
JB: And what brought you to New Haven originally?
SD: I got a swimming scholarship to Southern Connecticut State University. It was the only school I got into and it was only because of swimming. My grades were really bad for the first two years. At that point I was already living on my own. My mom moved to Kansas when I was 16. I didn’t have anywhere else to go. I just figured I may as well live on some school loans and live in a dormitory for free basically. Well, not free. I had to pay it back. I knew about The Space. I knew the owner of The Space somehow through my mother.
JB: And then how did you start working at Miya’s?
SD: Our guitar player, who you saw play with us in New York, he worked there, and our drummer got in a motorcycle accident. So I couldn’t work for like a month and then I didn’t have money and I was living at the rehearsal space. And then our guitar player, who was already playing with us a little bit, said that he could get me a job there because he worked there. They saved my life. They really treat you like family.
JB: That’s my favorite restaurant in the world. I love that place. Do you think you’ll try to keep working there for a while, or do you eventually want to make your whole living off music? Do you think that’s feasible?
SD: I want to spend as much time playing and working on that stuff as I can. So I want to work as little as possible or not at all. It used to be a goal of mine to live off music, but I don’t know if I’m interested in spending my time trying to make that happen. I’d rather just spend my time trying to have the time. So right now Miya’s takes good care of me and I don’t have anything in New York that’s coming up right now that will allow me to be as flexible with my schedule as I am with them and make as much money quickly. I’m not actively trying to stop working at Miya’s. But, I don’t know if in a year I might want to stop commuting.
JB: So I saw on Facebook, you recently debuted a side project called Sasquatch Fucker. (laughs)
SD: Yeah, Sasquatch Fucker is kind of this art installment…a very crass art installment band. It’s just me and this guy I work with at Miya’s.
JB: Dave Corsack.
SD: Yep. So every once in a while, usually when he’s fighting with his girlfriend or breaking up with her, he all of a sudden has time, and then we go to his storage space rehearsal cube and we play blistering, loud music about really, really crass and tasteless things. And we speak in Southern accents and we have stage personas. But that was the first time we did it live and it was really spur of the moment and half the people really, really hated it. And half the people really, really loved it. So, I think that was a success.
JB: Yeah, you always want to have strong feelings as opposed to indifference.
SD: Right right. Because even the people who hate it are talking about it. They’re like, Sidewalk Dave is totally making a fool of himself or a fool of us or not taking it seriously anymore. At least they’re talking about it.
JB: You recently donated a song to a benefit compilation for Hurricane Sandy. I just wanted to know what your experience with the storm was, and how it affected people you knew in New York or elsewhere.
SD: A lot of the people I know personally weren’t in any sort of emergency state, and for me it was like a windy night. I didn’t know how bad it was until the next day when it was on the news. And then to better understand the effect it had, I went and volunteered in Rockaway in Queens that was hit really, really bad, and those people are still homeless and still screwed up, and I’m trying to go once a week if I can, even though I haven’t been in the city, to go and volunteer. It’s worse than people think in a lot of ways. So I was really excited and jumped at the chance to be on the compilation, and I hope it does well. I don’t know about the Red Cross, though. I don’t know how much help they were at the beginning. They might be doing better stuff now. But that’s where the money’s going. I don’t know if I agree with that completely, but it’s better than nothing I suppose.